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How do I care for someone with keratitis?

Diana Meeks
Diana Meeks on behalf of Sigma Nursing
Family Practitioner

If your loved one is suffering from a mild case of keratitis, you can make sure that they are taking their medication on time and that they are refraining from touching their eyes. Other instructions may include avoiding eye makeup, using painkillers, wearing protective glasses or eye patches as prescribed, and not using contacts lenses (especially at night).

If your loved one has severe keratitis, however, they may be dealing with serious vision impairment or loss. Such impairments can be hard to deal with. Support your loved one emotionally through this trying time, and help them do daily visual tasks if they begin to struggle.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.