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How do medications treat uveitis?

Diana Meeks
Diana Meeks on behalf of Sigma Nursing
Family Practitioner

Medication used for treatment of uveitis often includes corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. Corticosteroids are potent drugs that are useful for treating inflammatory conditions. They reduce the human body's ability to fight an infection by suppressing the inflammation and produce the same effect on the body as the hormone cortisone. Immunosuppressive or cytotoxic agents are even stronger than corticosteroids and actually interfere with the human immune system. These drugs are used only when uveitis does not respond to corticosteroids and might cause permanent and rapid damage to vision. If uveitis is caused by another infection, antibiotics, with or without corticosteroids, are used to treat it.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.