Healthy Eye and Vision

Healthy Eye and Vision

Healthy Habits For The Eyes & Vision

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Get currants:  Black currants contain the compound anthocyanosides, which may be helpful for promoting night vision. Also called cassis, they can be found in jams, jellies, scones, and pies.

    Be green:  Two other nutrients that show promise in improving eye health are lutein and zeaxanthin. They sound exotic but are easy to find.

        •Good lutein sources: spinach, peas, and green bell peppers

        •Good sources of zeaxanthin: corn, spinach, orange bell peppers, and tangerines

     

     

     

     


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Limit your intake of carbohydrates that are quickly digested and absorbed, such as white bread, corn chips, and other refined grains. Diets rich in these “high-glycemic” foods have been shown to increase a key risk factor for the development of macular degeneration.


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    Children can focus at close distance without eyestrain better than adults. They often develop the habit of holding reading materials close to their eyes or sitting right in front of the television.

    There is no evidence that this damages their eyes, and the habit usually diminishes as children grow older. However, children with nearsightedness (myopia) sometimes sit very close to the television in order to see the images more clearly, so they should have an eye examination.

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    You may be seeing bright wavy lines while using your computer due to floaters in your eyes. Floaters are tiny bits of debris that float around in the eye and are usually harmless. It is more common to see floaters when you are staring at something bright and light colored, like a computer screen (especially if the screen has a white background), if you are looking at a white wall in a brightly lit room, or if you go outside at noon and stare off into a cloudless sky. 
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    We all know you're supposed to turn lights off when you're not using them. But you can also help by using compact fluorescent light bulbs. A 23-watt compact fluorescent will give you as much light as a 100-watt incandescent - and last ten times longer and use a quarter of the energy. The downside: They contain about 5 milligrams of mercury, so they need to be recycled properly. Check with your municipality for drop-offs for items containing mercury. (Different states have different regs; you can get more info on your state's recycling laws by checking www.lamprecycle.org.)

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    Looking at computer monitors will not harm your eyes. Often, when using a computer for long periods of time, just as when reading or doing other close work, you blink less often than normal. This reduced rate of blinking makes your eyes dry, which may lead to the feeling of eyestrain or fatigue.
    Try to take regular breaks to look up or across the room. Looking at objects farther away often relieves the feeling of strain on your eyes. Keep the monitor between 18 to 24 inches from your face and at a slight downward angle. Also consider the use of artificial tears. If your vision blurs or your eyes tire easily, you should have your eyes examined by an ophthalmologist.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Set your computer on a low table, or use a portable computer so your eyes look down when you work. This keeps the eyelid opening smaller, which reduces your chance of developing the condition dry eye. Also change your computer’s flicker rate to 70 or above to help reduce irritation.

    Look up from the screen every 20 minutes or so and stare 20 feet ahead for 20 seconds. If you sit at a computer all day, take a 10-minute break every two hours and go for a walk.
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    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is caused by viewing a computer screen for long periods of time. CVS can cause headaches, blurred vision, neck pain, fatigue, eye strain, dry eyes, double vision, vertigo/dizziness, and difficulty refocusing the eyes.
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    Working on computers or video display terminals (VDTs) will not permanently harm your eyes. However, when using a VDT for long periods of time, just as reading or doing other close work, you blink less than you normally would. This reduced rate of blinking makes your eyes dry, which may lead to the feeling of eyestrain or fatigue. It's worth reminding yourself to look away from the computer every 20 minutes or so to give your eyes a break. The target should be more than 10 feet away, and your break should last at least 20 seconds.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Set your computer lower on the table or use a portable computer so your eyes look down when you work. That way, the opening between the eyelids stays small, which reduces the risk of developing dry eyes.

    You can also help relieve some irritation by changing your flicker rate on your computer to 70 or above.