Advertisement

What are the checkpoints for good posture while standing?

Here are some power posture tips to remind you to keep your form straight:
  1. Stand tall with your chin parallel to the ground
  2. Pretend you are balancing a book on your head and look forward, not down
  3. Draw your shoulders together as if they are attempting to touch
  4. Pull your stomach toward your spine
  5. Lift up your chest and keep your neck long
  6. Tuck in your pelvis 
Diet for a Pain-Free Life: A Revolutionary Plan to Lose Weight, Stop Pain, Sleep Better and Feel Great in 21 Days, ADA...sound nutritional advice...do-able, delicious..a godsend to pain sufferers.

More About this Book

Diet for a Pain-Free Life: A Revolutionary Plan to Lose Weight, Stop Pain, Sleep Better and Feel Great in 21 Days, ADA...sound nutritional advice...do-able, delicious..a godsend to pain sufferers.

Do you wake up each morning aching with joint or muscle pain? Have you been trying to lose stubborn belly fat for years? Do you wish you could be active without pain medications? Look no further:...

This is very easy to see and if there are any deviations. The best way to look at your checkpoints for posture is as follows. Your ears, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles should all line up together. As with most people you will see things at each checkpoint. For most people the head is usually forward, shoulders are rounded, hips have a anterior tilt, knees point out and ankles are everted. Those are the most common and what to look for. So if you are not in alignment in these areas then there are common tight muscles and weak muscles that you need to work on to correct this. Seeing a fitness professional will help you identify these things.

There are five checkpoints you want to become aware of in order to maintain good posture during standing movements:
  • Foot and ankle: feet should be approximately shoulder-width apart with the toes pointing forward.
  • Knees: should always be kept soft rather than fully extended, and remain in line with the toes.
  • Pelvis: the pelvis should be level and in a neutral position. Watch for excessive lumbar extension (lordosis) or lumbar flexion (flat back).
  • Shoulders: should be level, not lifted or rounded forward.
  • Head: should be in a neutral position, not tilted to one side or protruding forward.
When standing, your feet should be hip to shoulder distance apart and facing forward. Knees should be forward and relaxed, and low back arch should be minimal. The spine should be tall and shoulders pulled back and relaxed. The head should be neutral with your ears in line with your shoulders.

Continue Learning about Evaluating & Measuring Fitness

Should I jump into local races even if I am not in race shape yet?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
Absolutely! Since there’s so much more to being a successful cyclist than merely having great fi...
More Answers
I joined a gym to lose weight, but I am gaining weight. Is it muscle?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
If you are new to training, you might be overestimating your expenditure. For example, if you’re...
More Answers
How can I assess my activity level?
Jay Morgan, NASM Elite TrainerJay Morgan, NASM Elite Trainer
The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous...
More Answers
How can I make best use of EPOC (Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption)?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption is the period of time after exercise where your body is stil...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.