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Can men develop erectile dysfunction later in life?

Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD
Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease)
Many men have a sense of inevitability about erectile dysfunction (ED). They assume it will just show up one day, like that AARP card that arrives in the mail when you turn 50. In fact, mid life is when the risk for erectile dysfunction begins to rise. About 4% of men in their 50s have erectile dysfunction, but that number quadruples among men in their 60s. If you make it to 80, there's about a 50% chance that you will have erectile dysfunction.

What about the other 50% of those octogenarians who are still sexually vigorous and capable? What's their secret? Simple: Studies show that men who exercise regularly, maintain a healthy weight, and don't smoke are less likely to develop erectile dysfunction. Ask your doctor to help you craft a plan for a long, healthy, and sexually fulfilling life.
It's pretty common for men to develop erectile dysfunction later in life. In fact, erectile dysfunction affects about half of men between 40 and 70 years old, somewhat and increases with age. However, erectile dysfunction isn't a normal or inevitable part of aging. Often, it affects older men because they're more likely to have underlying medical conditions that cause erectile dysfunction.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.