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What is a seizure?

A seizure is a result of abnormal electrical activity in the brain that causes temporary, involuntary changes in body movement, function, sensation, awareness or behavior.

Dr. Nicholas D Suite
Neurologist

A seizure is an abnormal electrical discharge within the brain that may or may not be associated with alteration or loss of consciousness. There are several sub-types of seizure, including those which manifest as isolated movements of muscle groups, sudden sensory complaints, sudden momentary or prolonged loss of awareness/consciousness, and even violent motor activity (convulsions).

The basis for seizure activity may be either structural or metabolic, i.e., there can be a stroke, bleeding or tumor in the brain that causes it. Alternatively, there may be a reaction to medication/illicit drugs, or an abnormal condition in the blood, e.g., low blood sugar, low magnesium or other electrolyte derangement.

Immediate treatment for a seizure is medically necessary, and Fire Rescue should be called right away if it should occur outside of a hospital setting.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.