Energy Boosters

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    How Does the Body Get Energy from the Foods We Eat?
    The body gets energy from the foods we eat by converting fats and proteins into energy for muscles, while carbohydrates are converted into sugars. Learn more in my video.
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    You may feel more tired during winter than other seasons because of longer nights. The body naturally wants to sleep more when it is dark out, so with longer nights some people's sleep/wake cycles reinforce more sleep. Some people may have seasonal affective disorder, which is a mood-related condition that is related to the decreased amount of sunlight during the winter months. You should talk to your doctor about any mood changes you notice, regardless of the season.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    There are many lifestyle factors that can affect energy levels including eating patterns, amount and quality of sleep, exercise habits or if there is a lack of exercise, medications (side effects) and stress.

    Focusing on eating patterns, keeping a food and fitness journal can show us typical food, beverage and lifestyle habits throughout the day in order to find areas for improvement. The following questions can help pinpoint areas to assure you are eating for energy:
    • What you are you eating? An optimal diet pattern would include eating fruits and vegetables every day, a variety of lean proteins, whole grains and low fat dairy sources. These foods provide the nutrients your body needs to stay healthy.
    • Are you eating enough calories? Food quantity can play a role in how you feel so identifying if you are eating too little or too much throughout the day.
    • What time are you eating your meals and snack? Just as important as what and how much you eat, is when you eat. Analyzing when you eat your first meal of the day (breakfast), the timing between the rest of your meals and snacks, and your exercise patterns can identify areas for improving how you feel energy-wise.
    • What are you drinking? Staying properly hydrated is important for everyone whether engaged in exercise or not. Caffeinated beverages, sugar sweetened beverages, energy drinks and alcohol could not only affect sleep quality but also how you feel in regards to your energy throughout the day.
    In addition to proper eating patterns, aiming for adequate amounts of sleep and moderate intensity exercise for at least 30 minutes on most days are three lifestyle areas that when adhered to, can address energy levels
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    There’s a lot you can do to help mimic the effects of that quick cup of coffee, without actually reaching for a cup of coffee. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to give yourself an energy boost without resorting to caffeine and other stimulants to wake you up. Thirty minutes of exercise, just four times a week, has proven to increase energy levels drastically after just six weeks. Exercise helps improve your lung capacity over time, allowing for more oxygen to reach your brain and muscles, waking you up and facilitating the production of energy in cells throughout your body. In the short term, increased heart rate and heightened blood flow from exercises as simple as taking a walk around the office instead of grabbing a cup of coffee can help you feel more energized. And exercise can be very simply incorporated into a busy lifestyle. Try going for a short walk during your lunch break, getting off the bus or subway a stop sooner than you normally would and walking a few extra blocks, or just doing some jumping jacks when you first wake up in the morning to get your heart pumping.

    Eating healthy is also ideal for keeping your energy levels up. Eating nutritious, all natural meals will give your body the essential nutrients it needs to function at its best. Eating a healthy breakfast within an hour of waking up will kick-start your metabolism and keep you feeling energized for several hours into the day. Incorporating protein and healthy fats into your breakfast is especially important for getting your energy kick-started in the morning. Whole-grain foods and healthy sources of protein like Greek yogurt, cage-free eggs, and grass-fed beef are all excellent energy-boosting foods to incorporate into your diet.

    Staying hydrated is another important way to keep your energy levels up. Water is absolutely essential for maintaining our metabolisms and keeping our energy levels up. Dehydration, even when minor, can make you feel sluggish, think foggily, and cause headaches. Drinking a glass or two of water will help your body keep your metabolism going and keep you feeling at your best.

    Most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, so make sure you make getting enough sleep a top priority in your life!

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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How Can I Boost My Energy Without Coffee?

    It's a cinch to achieve an energy surge without the help of caffeine. In this video, nutritionist Kate Geagan explains easy ways to boost energy.


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    Eating breakfast, especially protein (such as eggs and ham) is a great way to start the day. Eating lunch and a small dinner, ideally three hours before bedtime, are all basic meals to help your energy level. You can fit in healthy snacks (such as nuts, fruits and vegetables) once or twice between the main meals, depending on your exertion level throughout the day. Avoid empty calories such as carbs or sugars, which can be found in foods such as doughnuts and high-sugar cereals. These do not boost your energy level.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    One surefire way to fight your fatigue is to ban the snooze button. You've decided what time you are going to get up every day -- and that does not mean 15 minutes early and snoozing until it's time to get out of bed.

    Ditch the caffeine and find alternative ways to boost your energy, like aromatherapy, exercise, and spicy foods. Aromatherapy can wake up certain parts of the brain, and by inhaling some fresh lemon you can give yourself a lemon lift without spending $5 at Starbucks.

    Another tip is to counteract the energy drain caused by a heavy lunch with a preemptive multivitamin. Vitamins C and E open arteries and increase circulation; heavy meals laden with fat constrict arteries and make you sleepier.

    Boost your energy by taking D-ribose, or ribose, daily. Some research has found that natural D-ribose supplements can significantly improve energy. It's available in pill or powder form and is an essential energy source for your cells.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Who wouldn't want to feel more energized and have a smile on their face all day? But short of popping some "happy pills," it seems there's no easy way -- until now. Enter yoga.

    Yep, some simple yoga-style stretches and poses could do the trick. People who did them for five weeks reported a lift in their moods and more spring in their steps.

    A type of yoga that focuses on mood-boosting poses seemed to be particularly helpful in raising spirits in a recent study. In fact, people's moods not only generally improved about halfway through five weeks of doing Iyengar yoga, but posers also felt a bit better after class, too. Talk about instant gratification.

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    Sleep loss is a major energy drain. Our bodies and brains need six to nine hours of sleep to restore good brain-cell functioning (i.e., the ability to perform physically as well as mentally, since both coordination and thinking require those brain cells to work well). Getting on a regular bedtime schedule will help set your internal clock so your body knows when to sleep and when to wake.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - pb and banana quesadilla

    When you're low on energy and craving a fast morning pick-me-up, there's no need for a donut. For fewer than 200 calories, you can whip up a sweet and healthy treat that will taste delicious and get you going. In this video, Dr. Oz shows you how.

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