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How can I have better self-esteem?

Brooke Randolph
Marriage & Family Therapy
If you are struggling with self-esteem, let those around you tell you those things that make you special. Often those closest to you have a more accurate view of you than you do. If you have a healthy support team, you will hear positive things about yourself, not negative. Teach yourself to say "Thank you" to every compliment!

Would you allow someone else to put your child or best friend down in front of you or him/her? Do not allow people to do the same to you. Most importantly, do not accept negative comments from yourself! We are often our own harshest critics. The thoughts you have about yourself directly affect your self-esteem.

Have you ever listened to the messages you give yourself, the things you say within your own head or even say about yourself to others? How much of what you say is positive and uplifting v. negative and defeating? No matter how supportive those around you are, you cannot escape yourself and you have the most impact on yourself, your feelings, and your self-assessment. If you were choosing a roommate, best friend, or significant other, someone that would be around you frequently, you would want to choose someone who wasn't saying negative things about you. Are you treating yourself as well as you would treat someone else? Start responding to the negative things you say to yourself like you would respond to someone you care about if you heard them say those same things about themselves.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.