What are some healthy fruit snacks?

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Toby Smithson
Nutrition & Dietetics

Fresh fruit is the first “fast food” developed. Fruit can be a quick grab and go snack in its natural form. A favorite fruit snack is the baked apple and it is easy to prepare. Core a small apple and place in a microwave safe bowl, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar substitute; cook in microwave for approximately 2 minutes. This dish is only 55 calories. Another favorite healthy fruit snack is to combine fresh fruit in a cup and top with whipped topping, it is so delicious that it tastes like dessert. For no refrigeration needed snack, spread peanut or almond butter on either a banana or an apple.

Dee Sandquist
Nutrition & Dietetics
Fresh fruit is convenient for a snack. My favorite is plain yogurt with frozen blueberries or blackberries since it resembles ice cream's consistency with more nutrition and flavor. Commercial fruit snacks are very limited in nutrition content and are mostly sugar. Save your money and eat fresh fruit. Fresh, frozen or canned fruits can be used as a salad, dessert, or snack.
Paula Greer
Midwifery Nursing
Fruits may be high in sugars but they are also packed with essential nutrients and antioxidants. Some have more fiber than others.

The darker the fruits the higher the antioxidants and cancer fighting power.

Blueberries, blackberries, grapes make great ways to get your fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants in.

Citrus fruits like oranges, tangerines, grape fruit are also full of fiber and vitamin C and make great snacks.

Bananas are full of good things and easy to take on the go but are higher in calories so should not be eaten in excess if you are trying to lose weight.

Fruits can also be eaten as a frozen treat, a fruit bar and dried, just watch out for added sugars.
Doreen Rodo
Nutrition & Dietetics
Fruits make a great snack choice, as do vegetables. While it is important to include either in a healthy snack, there are some that are considered "super foods", such as blueberries, oranges, pumpkin, broccoli, tomatoes, and spinach. 

Try to add these and any other fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy, but non-traditional snack. You can slice some fresh tomatoes and broccoli adds a healthy marinade made with olive oil and spices. Pumpkin can be made into a bread, soup or a pudding (mix 1/2 c with 1/2 c diet vanilla pudding). Orange and Spinach salad is often something that is usually served at lunch or supper, but if you had some left over, it would make a great snack for the next day. 

Some more traditional snack options are: orange slices, blueberries or other fruits that can be dipped in low-fat yogurt or added to the top. Better yet, make a fruit kabob that includes a variety of fruits for a fun treat. Smoothies also make great snacks so as long as you are making them with fruit and other healthy ingredients, they are a good choice. Apples and peanut butter is a tasty option and if on the go, many restaurants like Subway or McDonald's have them pre-bagged. 

So, whether you choose a traditional or non-traditional snack, make sure that it includes a fruit or a vegetable for healthier eating.
Fruits not only satisfy your sweet tooth, but are packed with nutrients, such as vitamins A and C, folate, potassium, fiber and phytonutrients. You don't have to eat only fresh fruit; try some of these tasty and healthy fruit snacks:
  • Fruit pops: Freeze pureed fruit or juice in ice cube trays or paper cups with wooden sticks. Tangy pureed fruit options include mango, papaya or apricots, or orange juice.
  • Fruit mix: Mix a zipper-top bag of dried fruits of your choice: apple slices, apricots, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, pear slices and raisins.
  • Frozen chips: Slice bananas, seedless grapes, and/or berries into thin rounds and spread them flat on a baking pan and cover. Freeze and serve frozen as a fun snack.
  • Frugurt: Slice favorite fruits to top low-fat yogurt.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.