Why is eating breakfast important if I have diabetes?

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Jessica Crandall
Nutrition & Dietetics
Your body is in fasting mode when it is asleep, it goes somewhere between 8 and 12 hours without having a meal or a snack. If you have diabetes, then your body is not able to keep the sugar levels that you need balanced for your brain to work properly. When you break-the-fast (hence breakfast) it helps to jump start your brain with the glucose it has been missing while you were sleeping, and it wakes up your metabolism early so that it can go into a mode where it uses stored fat for energy. People with diabetes need to around three to six small meals a day, which constantly gives their brain fuel to function and their body constant nutrition to keep burning away the stored fat. Eating breakfast helps everyone keep a healthy lifestyle, regardless of having diabetes or not.
Janis Jibrin, MS, RD
Nutrition & Dietetics
Everything you've heard about the importance of breakfast is even truer for your diabetes. Eating the right type of breakfast will not only help control your blood sugar but will help slim you down and reduce your risk of heart disease and possibly cancer and other chronic diseases. Why are we such sticklers about breakfast? Because morning is the time when many people experience the highest blood sugar levels, and the right type of breakfast can help control them. Coffee and a doughnut won't cut it, but a whole grain cereal with nuts and fat-free milk, or an egg-based breakfast that's moderate in fat might mean the difference between a normal and a high blood sugar level two hours later.
The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes

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The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes

Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.