How can I help my child's hearing develop?

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Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD
Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease)
From the very beginning, you want to make the world of words and voice and sound and music available to your baby. Chatting to your child about what is going on around her, using statements ("It sounds like someone is at the front door!") and rhetorical questions ("Do you think it is Grandma?"), is extremely important. The first words that children say, they have heard thousands of times. Kids who live in a language-rich environment have bigger vocabularies and consequently higher intellectual function than those in a language-poor home. Reading to your child should be as natural as breathing and a daily activity or habit just like brushing your teeth. It should continue far beyond the time that he can read for himself, as you're able to read at a higher level and share the ideas and thoughts. In these early years, when boys and girls cannot sort out TV voices and household voices, the background noise of TV, CDs, and radio should be kept to a minimum. The natural sounds of a household and life should be available to them.
YOU: Raising Your Child: The Owner's Manual from First Breath to First Grade

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YOU: Raising Your Child: The Owner's Manual from First Breath to First Grade

There’s little doubt that parenting can be one of the most rewarding and satisfying experiences you’ll ever have. But it can be plenty tough, too: Around the clock, you’re working to keep your...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.