What are different forms of dystonia?

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There are many types of dystonia and many diseases and conditions may include dystonia as a symptom. Forms of dystonia include the following:
  • Focal dystonias affect a specific group of muscles or body part.
  • Musicians' dystonias are task-specific.
  • Early-onset generalized dystonia (DYT1 and non-DYT1) is characterized by twisting of the limbs and torso.
  • Dopa-responsive dystonia responds to a medication called levodopa.
  • Myoclonus dystonia is a hereditary form of dystonia that includes prominent myoclonus (irregular involuntary contraction of a muscle) symptoms.
  • Paroxysmal dystonias and dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders in which abnormal movements occur only during attacks.
  • X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism is a hereditary form of dystonia that includes symptoms of parkinsonism.
  • Rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism is a hereditary form of dystonia that includes symptoms of parkinsonism.
  • Secondary dystonias are triggered by factors such as trauma, medication exposure, toxins or neurological and metabolic disorders.
  • Psychogenic dystonia is secondary to underlying psychological and neurological causes.

Continue Learning about Dystonia

Dystonia

When your muscles contract involuntarily, the condition is called dystonia. Dystonia causes a twisting or clenching of whatever body part is affected. For example, when you have a stroke, the affected arm and hand may be clenched ...

and held in a strange position. Dystonia can be very mild or very severe. It can make your life very difficult and this can lead to frustration, depression or anxiety. See your doctor to treat your symptoms and talk over your frustrations.
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.