Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis
Diverticulitis occurs when diverticula (small, bulging pouches in the digestive tract) become infected or inflamed. Some signs of diverticulitis include severe pain, bloating that persists for weeks, constipation and blood in your stool. Treatment includes changes in diet, antibiotics and surgery.

Recently Answered

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    Since a partial colectomy removes the segment of colon affected with diverticulitis, removal of that segment (partial colectomy) prevents future attacks of diverticulitis in that particular segment.

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    If you have an acute episode of diverticulitis that does not respond to non-operative treatment; have complications such as perforation, abscess or bleeding due to diverticular disease or diverticulitis; or develop repeated episodes of diverticulitis requiring antibiotics and affecting your quality of life, surgery may be an option.

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    Surgery can usually be performed with laparoscopy (mini incisions). During the procedure your surgeon uses a video-monitor to perform a ‘laparoscopic colectomy’ using long instruments introduced through small incisions on the outside of your abdomen to remove the affected segment of your colon and rejoin the remaining healthy portions back together.

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    For severe attacks of diverticulitis, when complications develop or when individuals have repeated episodes of diverticulitis requiring antibiotics, surgery may be an option. Surgery usually entails removal of the portion of the colon (partial colectomy) that has been affected with diverticulitis.

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    To understand diverticular disease you first must understand what a diverticulum is. A diverticulum is an out-pouching or sac-like protrusion on the wall of the colon. These tend to be hollow protrusions. People with multiple out-pouchings (diverticula) have diverticulosis. When people with diverticulosis have a clinically significant finding, such as pain, then they are said to have diverticular disease. 
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    A , Gastroenterology, answered
    Diverticulosis is a condition where the colon develops little pockets (potholes) as a result of a diet that's relatively low in fiber and high in animal products. For most of my patients with diverticulosis, I recommend 1 or 2 heaping tablespoons of ground psyllium husk to help them reach their fiber intake target goal. Fiber cleans out the colon and the colon is one of the major routes for toxins to be expelled from the body. Having a good bowel movement is really the ultimate detox.

    When you reach that magic number of 35 grams of fiber, some amazing things start to happen. In addition to magnificent stools that drop effortlessly into the bowl, your risk for a lot of the other things that kill Americans -- many types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and stroke -- all drop too. An apple (or two) a day really does keep the doctor away.
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    Once colon pockets have developed in the colon there is no guaranteed way to prevent rare future complications from occurring. However, increasing dietary fiber and taking a fiber supplement is the best way to help reduce the likelihood of future problems.

    In those patients who are having repeated cases of diverticulitis or bleeding, surgery to remove the affected part of the colon is usually recommended.
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    Complications of diverticulitis can include complete colon perforation, fistulas (tunnels) to the bladder or vagina, and narrowing or blockage of the intestine. Surgery is almost always required in these serious cases.

    Bleeding typically does not occur with diverticulitis but can occur from one of the non-inflamed pockets (diverticulosis). Most bleeding from diverticulosis stops on its own, but blood transfusions and surgery are sometimes required.
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    Following a special diet won’t reverse the presence of diverticulosis, but many theorize that diverticuli – pouches or sacs in the intestinal wall – occur from a Western, low-fiber diet. Even though evidence supporting this theory is sparse, many physicians recommend following a high-fiber diet to reduce symptomatic flare-ups or complications. Scheduling a counseling session with a local nutritionist on fiber-rich foods has no downside and will probably even improve overall health.

    A common misconception is that nuts and seeds will aggravate diverticulosis causing painful inflammation resulting in diverticulitis. This is not true, and patients with diverticulosis are not at any increased risk from eating sesame seeds, strawberries, tomatoes, or nuts. Many people believed such small particles would clog diverticuli and cause inflammation. During a colonoscopy, physicians often find stool within diverticuli, not seeds.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Meatless diverticulitis diet

    Going vegetarian can help improve many health conditions, but will it make a difference in diverticulitis? In this video, Dr. Oz and Dr. Linda Lee discuss the connection between diet and diverticulitis.