What is a deceased donor liver transplantation?

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Traditionally the most common type of transplantation, this procedure uses a liver that becomes available when a person dies and his or her family donates the organ for transplantation. Patients who need a deceased donor organ are registered with the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), which maintains the national database of all patients waiting for a deceased donor organ.

Waiting times for a deceased donor liver vary depending on the patient's severity of illness, blood type, and overall demand. Because the liver is able to regenerate, it is possible for a deceased donor organ to be divided, with each half transplanted into a different recipient. Sometimes called "split-liver" transplantation, this resourceful allocation of scarce donor organs enables more patients to receive transplants.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.