How can I lower the risk of deficiencies in my diet?

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Michaela Ballmann
Nutrition & Dietetics
The best way to lower the risk of nutrient deficiencies in your diet is to make sure you're eating enough calories to support your lifestyle and activity level; consume a wide variety of colorful fruits and vegetables; eat unrefined carbohydrates (low-carbohydrate diets or diets high in refined starches can be low in fiber and other vitamins and minerals); and don't exclude any entire food group (vegetarians and vegans can use meat and dairy substitutes).
Natalie Weiss
Nutrition & Dietetics
One of the best ways is to vary your diet. Eat foods from all colors of the rainbow. Consider recording your intake for 3 days and then reflect on the results. Look and see if you are eating from all the food groups; think about the types and colors of foods you are eating. If you consistently eat the same foods every day, try switching things up! Bottom line: eat a colorful and varied diet.
Jim White
Nutrition & Dietetics

The first step to lowering the risk of deficiencies in your diet is to eat a well balanced diet that incorporates food from all of the food groups. Even with eating the proper foods it is still possible to have deficiencies. A multi-vitamin might be a good source of nutrients for you and could be something that you can talk to a dietitian about. A registered dietitian can also guide you in understanding the proper foods you should be eating to get the most out of your diet.  

Alberta Scruggs
Nutrition & Dietetics
Learning what vitamins and minerals are needed by your body is the first step toward lowering risk of nutrient deficiencies.

Next, you want to eat a well-balanced diet that incorporates food from all nutrient categories (carbohydrate, fat, minerals, proteins, vitamins and minerals).

If you think you are not getting the nutrients you need from the food you eat, talk to a dietitian/physician. The dietitian will help identify foods that provide the nutrient you may be lacking. The physician will recommend supplementation when and if needed.

For more information on nutrient needs go to:

http://iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/RDA%20and%20AIs_Vitamin%20and%20Elements.pdf
Jessica Crandall
Nutrition & Dietetics

To lower the risk of deficiencies in your diet it is best to incorporate a variety of foods that are nutrient rich. I also suggest working with your medical team to ensure that appropriate labs are drawn during your annual visit to identify if there is a deficiency present and using supplementation guided by a Registered Dietitian if needed.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.