How much calcium should I take for healthy bones?

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Harris H. McIlwain, MD
Rheumatology
While the calcium recommendation for adults is approximately 1,000-1,200 milligrams per day (higher for pregnant and lactating women, postmenopausal women, and elderly men and women), the average adult gets only two-thirds to three-fourths of that amount. Some studies reveal that 80 percent of American women do not get adequate amounts of this bone-strengthening mineral. For example, extreme dieting can result in loss of bone density if you aren’t ingesting adequate calcium. A low calcium intake during adolescence also affects bone density, as can certain medications and other risk factors. But getting adequate calcium through foods or supplements is something you can do each day to prevent back pain from fractures.
Diet for a Pain-Free Life: A Revolutionary Plan to Lose Weight, Stop Pain, Sleep Better and Feel Great in 21 Days, ADA...sound nutritional advice...do-able, delicious..a godsend to pain sufferers.

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Diet for a Pain-Free Life: A Revolutionary Plan to Lose Weight, Stop Pain, Sleep Better and Feel Great in 21 Days, ADA...sound nutritional advice...do-able, delicious..a godsend to pain sufferers.

Do you wake up each morning aching with joint or muscle pain? Have you been trying to lose stubborn belly fat for years? Do you wish you could be active without pain medications? Look no further:...

Adequate calcium for people of all ages, from children to the elderly, is necessary for optimal skeletal health. Getting an adequate amount of calcium can help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. People over sixty-five who take calcium and vitamin D are also less likely to lose teeth.

However, contrary to popular belief, the healthiest or safest amount of dietary calcium has not yet been established. The National Academy of Science recommends that women aged over fifty consume 1,200 mg per day; a similar British committee recommends 700 mg a day. Foods high in calcium include milk, cheese, and other dairy products; dark leafy greens; beans; and foods such as orange juice that are calcium-fortified.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

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Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

FROM THE EDITORS OF THE CLASSIC "BIBLE OF WOMEN'S HEALTH," A TRUSTWORTHY, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE TO HELP EVERY WOMAN NAVIGATE THE MENOPAUSE TRANSITION For decades, millions of women have relied on Our...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.