Diet & Nervous System

Diet & Nervous System

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Add Chinese club moss to your daily vitamin regimen. Taking less than 100 micrograms of the herb daily may protect your brain's neurotransmitters and keep synapses firing correctly, tests suggest. But this herb is powerful, so check with your doctor for drug interactions.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Blueberries pack a mighty antioxidant wallop because they have the highest anthocyanidin content of all fruits, giving blueberries their dark color. These powerful antioxidant phytochemicals not only zap free radicals, but they also act like smart pills for your brain and have been shown to enhance memory, help rejuvenate brain cells and prevent dementia. Research shows that the blueberry ranks the highest of 60 fruits and vegetables in the ability to destroy free radicals. A half cup of blueberries has more than 70 milligrams (mg) of brain-boosting anthocyanidins, only 40 calories and just 10 grams (g) of total carbs. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Here are some brain-boosting snacks:
    • apple and low-fat cheese
    • whole-grain cracker (like Ryvita or Wasa) with a schmeer of cashew butter (about 2 teaspoons) and topped with sliced strawberries
    • ½ sliced banana in 1 cup fat-free plain yogurt, with a dash of cinnamon
    • the classic: ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese and ¼ sliced cantaloupe or honeydew melon
    • 2 figs (fresh or dried) sliced and topped with a few walnuts halves (try figs dipped in tahini, a sesame paste that makes great dips and salad dressings, with a few drops of honey).
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    The active ingredient in Indian curry, turmeric, contains resveratrol, the same powerful antioxidant that makes red wine good for brain health. Eat curry once a week, or sprinkle it on salads, to protect brain cells from harmful free radicals.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    A snack of almonds and blueberries is better brain food than a candy bar. As they lower blood sugar, healthy snacks can improve cognition. In this case, the omega-3 fatty acids in the almonds and the antioxidants in the blueberries can keep your brain functioning correctly.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A well-balanced diet can help children of any age optimize their brainpower or thinking skills in and out of the classroom.
    • Start with the power of breakfast. Studies show eating breakfast improves attention and is associated with higher academic achievement. A good pick: whole-grain cereal, like oatmeal, topped with fruit and nuts.
    • Eat brain foods throughout the day. It's important to keep energy and concentration up with regular meals and snacks. Avoid items that can cause a sugar rush followed by a crash. Good picks: proteins (turkey, tofu, beans and nuts), whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables.
    Additional food for thought: A growing amount of research suggests omega-3 fatty acids, commonly found in fish such as salmon, help feed critical brain cell membranes that may aid in learning and memory.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Generally, what's harmful to your heart is also harmful to your brain. Make no mistake-no matter how many of those fried potato skins are busting your buttons, a portion gets shuttled up through your arteries to your brain.

    Saturated fats, for example, clog arteries that lead to your brain, putting you at increased risk of a stroke. Omega-3 fatty acids-those fats found in fish-however, are helpful for your brain because they help keep your arteries clear. They also reduce depression.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Walnut Salad
    If you love the crunch of croutons on your salad, try walnuts instead. Omega-3 fatty acids in walnuts have been found to improve mood and calm inflammation that may lead to brain-cell death. They also replace lost melatonin, which is necessary for healthy brain functioning.
    Walnut Salad
    See All 3 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of

    A healthy alternative to a burger and fries would be a salmon burger with a side of sweet potato, zucchini spears or your favorite vegetable.  You can also try a tuna salad (light on the mayo) in a whole wheat pita with spinach on the side. A great vegetarian option is a broccoli stir fry with fresh ginger.  Enjoy fresh or frozen blueberries for dessert.

     

    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Have you ever noticed that you don't tend to get hungry when you're busy and then, when you start thinking about food, suddenly you want it? There's a fundamental relationship between thinking about food and eating. When you're craving food even when you aren't hungry, it's likely that you're bored, tired, stressed, or trying to avoid something you don't want to do. You're probably looking for a way to distract yourself from the resistance you're feeling and the negative or stressful thoughts that underlie it.

    These thoughts create uncomfortable feelings, and rather than ignore them or sit with them until they dissipate, you make a beeline to the refrigerator to change your experience. Yet when something happens that requires your immediate attention, food is the farthest thing from your mind. When the house is on fire, I guarantee that you're not thinking about your stomach. If you're thinking about food when you aren't hungry, try asking yourself, "What experience am I trying to avoid right now?"

    The problem with thinking about food is that it leads to eating. Of course, this isn't a problem if you're actually hungry and it's time to eat. But if you're in the habit of thinking about food often, it's likely that you're eating more food, and more pleasure food in particular, than your body needs. Thinking about food can become our mind's default position, coming in whenever we're stressed, excited, overwhelmed, upset, elated, or bored -- any excuse to think about food will do. The key to skinny thinking is becoming more aware of how you think about food and how often you think about it.