Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications.

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    A Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered on behalf of
    There are several reasons to keep a medication list. For one thing, studies show surprisingly poor communication between physicians and their patients regarding medications. Maybe the doctor thought she said to take the pill twice a day, but you understood it to be once a day. And if, like most people, you see more than one doctor, you're probably the only one who knows what they've all prescribed. Last, medical records are often incomplete or inaccurate. Your list can set things right.
    Include the name of each medication, the tablet or capsule strength, how many tablets or capsules you take, and when you take them. Update the list every time there is a change. If you take insulin, indicate what type, how many units, and when you take it. Be sure to also include any over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or supplements you take.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Your doctor will need to test your liver and kidney function before starting treatment. If you have moderate to severe liver disease, you should not take pioglitazone. If you have mild liver disease, pioglitazone may not be a good option for you. Rosiglitazone may cause elevated liver enzymes, hepatitis, and liver failure.

    If you have NYHA class III or IV heart failure, you should not take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone. If you have any other type of symptomatic heart failure, a glitazone may not be a good option for you.

    If you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or may be pregnant, glitazones may not be a good option for you. It is not known if they are safe for pregnant women.

    You should not take a glitazone if you are breastfeeding.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Side effects may include low blood sugar, headache, acid reflux, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and skin problems at the injection site. Some people have had severe allergic reactions, pancreatitis, or gallstones. Suicidal thoughts have occurred in some people taking liraglutide. GLP-1 receptor agonists have caused thyroid cancer in animals.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    The best time to take your diabetic medication will vary depending on the medicine you're taking. For example, among pills for diabetes, some are meant to be taken before a meal, some at the first bite of a meal and some with food. Some are taken twice a day while others might be taken three times daily. Insulin may be taken as injections a few times a day or given by pump as a steady dose throughout the day. You and your doctor need to choose not only the best medications for controlling your diabetes, but also the best times to take those medications.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - diabetes drugs and the brain

    Inexpensive diabetes drugs may do more than regulate insulin. In this video, Dr. Robin Miller explains how both metformin and glucophage can boost brain health, and who can benefit.

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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Side effects may include inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), liver failure, and severe hypersensitivity reactions. Other side effects may include headaches, cough, inflamed throat and sinuses, upper respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, joint pain, and back pain.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A answered
    In 2006, the FDA approved the first DPP-IV inhibitor, an oral medication that increases the body’s ability to produce insulin.

    Both DPP-IV inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists help glucose remain stable for longer periods and have few side effects. Unlike the sulfonylureas, used decades earlier, these medications do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    The nutritional management of diabetes is complicated, and is discussed in detail in my textbook, Nutritional Medicine (www.doctorgaby.com).

    People with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin in their body, and will therefore need to continue insulin therapy indefinitely. In many cases, people with type 2 diabetes can be managed effectively with dietary modifications and nutritional supplements. Dietary modifications that may be beneficial include losing weight if overweight; avoiding refined sugar and other refined carbohydrates; and emphasizing foods that are high in fiber (particularly legumes). Nutritional supplements that may lower blood sugar levels include chromium and biotin.

    For diabetics with advanced kidney disease, dietary changes can be dangerous. In addition, starting a diet-and-supplement program may require a change in the dosage of diabetes medication. For these and other reasons, people with diabetes should always consult a knowledgeable healthcare practitioner before starting a nutrition program for diabetes.

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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Side effects may include headaches, dizziness, flu-like symptoms, upper respiratory infections, joint pain, back pain, fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and constipation.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    Different diabetes pills work in different ways to keep your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol on track. That's why you might be taking two or more pills for your blood glucose, blood pressure, or cholesterol. All the pills keep your ABCs (A1C level, blood pressure, and cholesterol) of diabetes on track. Keeping your ABCs of diabetes on target will keep you healthier. It will lower your chances of getting diabetes problems.