What is an oatmeal cookie recipe for people with diabetes?

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Sometimes, nothing will satisfy but an oatmeal cookie. This clever recipe trims the carbs and sugar from that classic treat, while upping the flavor with spices like cardamom. The result is a cookie that's worry-free for people with diabetes, but delicious.  

Oatmeal Bar Cookies
    
Ingredients

cooking spray
1/2 cup SPLENDA Brown Sugar Blend
1/2 cup old fashioned rolled oats
1 tsp cardamom, ground
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp mace, ground
3 tbsp unsalted butter, diced, chilled
1 oz semi sweet chocolate chips, melted for garnish (optional)
1 cup whole wheat flour, sifted

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Coat 13"x9"x2" baking dish with cooking spray.
3. In food processor, combine flour, SPLENDA, oats, cardamon, cream of tartar, baking soda, and mace. Pulse to mix and chop oats.
4. Add butter and process until mixture is crumbly.
5. Sprinkle evenly into baking dish. Using back of spatula, press dough evenly and firmly into dish.
6. Bake until golden, 17 to 20 minutes. To garnish, drizzle melted chocolate over cookies.
7. Cut into squares while hot. Place pan on cooling rack. Allow to cool completely.
 
Makes 26 servings
Note: Optional items are not included in nutritional facts.

Calories 48.1
Total Carbs 8.1 g
Dietary Fiber 0.7 g
Sugars 3.7 g
Total Fat 1.5 g
Saturated Fat 0.9 g
Unsaturated Fat 0.7 g
Potassium 34.1 mg
Protein 0.8 g
Sodium 12.6 mg

Continue Learning about Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ...

is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications.
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.