Advertisement

What spare continuous glucose monitor parts should I bring when traveling?

William Lee Dubois
Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
I always carry one more sensor than I need when I travel. If it is a short trip and I’ve just started a sensor that’s running well, I carry one spare. If it is a longer trip or if I’m toward the end of a sensor run, I carry two spares. If you are using a CGM that takes AAA batteries, spares can go with your checked bags. If they lose your bags, you can always buy more. If you need a recharger for your CGM monitor, it should go in your carry-on.

You should also have spare I.V. Prep or Skin Prep, Uni-Solve and IV 3000˚s—if you use them. In short, carry spares of everything you need for CGM survival, and then some.
Beyond Fingersticks: The art of control with continuous glucose monitoring

More About this Book

Beyond Fingersticks: The art of control with continuous glucose monitoring

Everything you ever wanted to know about CGM (but didn’t know to ask)!Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), the revolutionary technology that’s poised to completely change diabetes care, gives you...

Continue Learning about Diabetes

Are You Ready to Try a Plant-Based Diet?
Are You Ready to Try a Plant-Based Diet?
If you’ve read anything about healthy eating plans for people with diabetes, you’ve probably seen the term “plant-based diet.” But what does it mean? ...
Read More
Should I use carbohydrate counting or the glycemic index for my diabetes?
American Diabetes AssociationAmerican Diabetes Association
Research shows that both the amount and the type of carbohydrate in food affect blood glucose levels...
More Answers
4 Ways Winter Affects Your Diabetes
4 Ways Winter Affects Your Diabetes4 Ways Winter Affects Your Diabetes4 Ways Winter Affects Your Diabetes4 Ways Winter Affects Your Diabetes
Cold hands could be a bigger problem than you think.
Start Slideshow
Do I Have to Prick My Skin to Test My Blood Glucose?
Do I Have to Prick My Skin to Test My Blood Glucose?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.