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What medications can raise my insulin level?

Dr. Jack Merendino, MD
Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
Many diabetes medications work by increasing the amount of insulin made in your body.  These include medications in the sulfonylurea class—glipizide (brand name Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl) and glyburide (Micronase and Glynase), and in the meglitinide class—repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix).  Sitagliptin (Januvia) and saxagliptin (Onglyza) are also drugs that increase the insulin made by your body.  All of these are oral medications.  The injectable drugs exenatide (Byetta) and liraglutide (Victoza) also help your body make more insulin. 
The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes

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The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes

Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading...

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