Advertisement

How can I avoid high blood glucose levels after meals if I'm on insulin?

There are several things you can do to help avoid high blood glucose levels after meals if you are on insulin:
  • Give yourself a pre-meal dose of fast-acting insulin about 20-30 minutes before you actually eat. You can give yourself about 30-40% of what you think you will need for that meal and then the rest later. This pre-meal amount, or bolus, is called “priming the pump.” It has been shown to really limit the post-meal blood sugar spike. If you wear a pump it is quite easy. However, if you are using an insulin pen you will have to give yourself two injections for the meal. 
  • Try to limit the amount of rapid-acting carbohydrates in your meal. This may be hard to do, but definitely cut out drinks with a lot of sugar calories. And, no fruit! 
  • Spread out your calorie intake as best you can. I know this seems like a pain but eat slowly and, if you can, save part of your meal for later as a snack. Mixing your rapid-acting carbohydrates with fat and protein can help as well. 
  • Try Afrezza, the inhaled insulin. It has a rapid-on rapid-off course of action that helps limit how high your glucose goes after eating. It also reduce your chances of having a delayed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) reaction.

Continue Learning about Diabetes

Who Should Consider Using a Pre-Filled Insulin Pen?
Who Should Consider Using a Pre-Filled Insulin Pen?
In this video, endocrinologist Jack Merendino, MD, discusses pre-filled insulin pens, a method for taking insulin that some people with diabetes may p...
Read More
How are weight and diabetes related?
RealAgeRealAge
Skyrocketing rates of diabetes are directly linked to America's burgeoning waistline. More than 85 p...
More Answers
How to Get the Best Possible Care for Your Diabetes
How to Get the Best Possible Care for Your DiabetesHow to Get the Best Possible Care for Your DiabetesHow to Get the Best Possible Care for Your DiabetesHow to Get the Best Possible Care for Your Diabetes
The right backup can help you live well and worry less about complications.
Start Slideshow
How Is Type 1 Diabetes Different From Type 2?
How Is Type 1 Diabetes Different From Type 2?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.