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How does blood glucose feed cells?

William Lee Dubois
Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
Your blood is a living liquid made up largely of plasma—nothing more than a soup of dissolved proteins, minerals, hormones, cellular garbage, and glucose.

The glucose floating around in your plasma is cell food. It’s what every living cell in your body depends on for energy. Everything thing you eat is converted into glucose by your digestive system and dumped into your bloodstream. To get the glucose from the blood into each cell, your body uses a hormone called insulin. You can think of insulin as a waitress whose job it is to deliver food to the cell’s table.
Beyond Fingersticks: The art of control with continuous glucose monitoring

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Beyond Fingersticks: The art of control with continuous glucose monitoring

Everything you ever wanted to know about CGM (but didn’t know to ask)!Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), the revolutionary technology that’s poised to completely change diabetes care, gives you...

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