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What should I know about glucose test strips for measuring my blood sugar?

If you have diabetes, your doctor or clinician will show you how to check your blood sugar -- or glucose -- levels with a glucose monitor. To use this device, you poke your finger with a lancet and lancing device, and squeeze a drop of blood onto a glucose test strip. Depending on different brands or models, some require more blood samples than others. The blood glucose test strips will then be inserted into the blood glucose meter. There are chemicals on the strip that react with your blood sample that will estimate the amount of sugar in your blood.

Generally, the manufacturer of glucose meters specifically designed their blood glucose test strips for their meters. You may also need to check to see if your meter is 'coded" to match a particular batch of diabetes test strips. In this case you would have to enter a code number into the meter or by inserting a code chip. Some diabetes test strips have the coding built in. Each time you open a new vial of test strips, you would have to "code' your meter. Remember to store your strips in their original container away from heat, humidity because temperature and exposure to air can all affect strips.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.