Will a poorly controlled blood glucose level affect gum disease?

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If you have diabetes, you are at greater risk of developing some oral health problems, including gum disease, because of the body’s inability to process sugar. Recent research suggests that the connection between gum disease and diabetes goes both ways. On the one hand, because of lowered resistance and a longer healing process, gum disease appears to be more frequent and more severe among those with diabetes. Conversely, it appears that treating gum disease in people with diabetes can help improve blood sugar control.
People with poorly controlled blood glucose levels have an increased risk for gum disease. Blood glucose (also called blood sugar) is an essential form of energy that you need to function. However, having too much glucose in the blood can cause several different health problems. For one, excess blood glucose may weaken the immune system, and a healthy immune system is essential for fighting the bacterial infection that causes gum disease. People with diabetes have a higher than normal risk for gum disease since their bodies don't control blood glucose levels efficiently. If you have diabetes, be sure to take all prescribed medications and follow your doctor's diet instructions in order to keep your blood sugar at a safe level.
Yes. High blood glucose levels make gum disease worse. Like all infections, gum disease can be a factor in causing blood sugar to rise, making diabetes harder to control.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.