Depression
Advertisement
Advertisement

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Dreary days can get to all of us -- but for some, the winter blues can be a real disorder. Test your SAD knowledge with this quiz.

Begin Quiz
Seasonal Affective Disorder
Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 1 of 20 Correct

Can a person have seasonal affective disorder in the summer?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can occur in summer months, but it's much rarer than SAD that occurs in the winter. As summer approaches, people with "reverse SAD" begin feeling more agitated and depressed. They also sleep and eat less and lose weight unintentionally.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 2 of 20 Correct

How many winters, typically, must you be affected by SAD before a doctor will diagnose you with the condition?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Most doctors diagnose SAD after two consecutive winters with symptoms of the disorder.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 3 of 20 Correct

What age group is affected most frequently by SAD?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Seasonal affective disorder is most common in adults aged 20 to 30. And women develop SAD at a ratio of 3 to 1 over men.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 4 of 20 Correct

Which of these individuals is most likely to have seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: SAD appears to have a genetic basis and run in families. If your parents, siblings or children develop SAD, you may be more likely to develop it, too.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 5 of 20 Correct

If you have SAD, you're likely to do which of the following?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above are common symptoms of SAD. People with the condition tend to eat more carb-heavy, starchy and sugary foods. They also tend to sleep more frequently and gain weight during the winter months.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 6 of 20 Correct

True or false: Seasonal affective disorder rarely goes away on its own.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Most cases of SAD will disappear when spring arrives -- and the sun returns. But the lasting effects of SAD -- such as those extra pounds -- may take longer to erase.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 7 of 20 Correct

A person living in which of these states is most likely to have seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Sorry, New Englanders: you're seven times more likely to develop SAD than a person living in, say, Florida. That's because SAD is most common in more northern climates where the sun's time in the sky is even more limited, and cold weather keeps daylight hours too chilly to enjoy the outdoors.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 8 of 20 Correct

Which person may be exhibiting a side effect of untreated seasonal disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: SAD is a form of depression, and if it is left untreated, it can become serious. Without medication or other treatment, people with SAD may withdraw from friends, family and society completely; they might also develop substance or alcohol abuse problems or suicidal thoughts or behavior. If you believe you or a loved one has SAD, see a doctor for treatment as soon as you can. Treatment is key to preventing larger problems.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 9 of 20 Correct

Which of these fruits can help you maintain a better mood?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Feeling SAD? Try a mango for breakfast. The tropical fruit has vitamin B6, which can help boost mood. Bananas can help, too. In general, a healthy diet of fruits and vegetables can help ease SAD symptoms, so eat up.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 10 of 20 Correct

Eating which of these foods can help you keep SAD at bay?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The capsaicin in chili peppers provides you with a boost of energy, helping fight the lethargy that SAD can cause. It also enhances blood circulation, which evens out oxygen flow.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 11 of 20 Correct

A deep whiff of this may offer relief from SAD:

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Peppermint oil has been shown to help ease the symptoms of depression and boost energy. Rub a little on your wrist and inhale when you need a pick-me-up.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 12 of 20 Correct

Which of these practices may help prevent seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: You can ward off SAD by beginning light therapy (using full-spectrum lightbulbs in your home and work) early in the fall. Talk with your doctor about how light therapy works.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 13 of 20 Correct

Which of the following may help you combat SAD?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Because SAD is thought to develop due to a lack of light, light therapy may be able to help reverse the effects. A combination of artificial light and outdoor walks in sunshine may be able to help get levels of melatonin and serotonin back to normal. Ask your doctor about how to best use light therapy to treat your SAD.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 14 of 20 Correct

True or false: Tanning beds can help you fight SAD.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Light therapy can come from fluorescent or incandescent bulbs, but most doctors do not recommend using lights that emit UV light, such as those in tanning beds, due to the risk of developing skin cancer.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 15 of 20 Correct

How much light therapy is needed each day to treat SAD?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Using light therapy for as little as 30 minutes each day can make a difference when treating SAD.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 16 of 20 Correct

Which of these symptoms of seasonal affective disorder is often worse in children?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: While most symptoms of SAD are similar in adults and kids, teenagers tend to struggle with a low self-esteem when they have SAD. It's important for parents to recognize the symptoms of SAD in their children so they can receive the help they need.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 17 of 20 Correct

Which of the following brain chemicals does NOT play a role in seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Research shows SAD develops due to changes in melatonin and serotonin, two brain chemicals that affect mood. When sunlight is scarce, serotonin levels fall, triggering depression. Melatonin levels, which also regulate your body's internal clock, fall out of rhythm, further dragging down your mood.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 18 of 20 Correct

Low levels of which vitamin are also thought to up your risk for seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Some research suggests low levels of vitamin D may affect your risk for developing SAD. Our bodies naturally produce vitamin D when the skin is exposed to sunlight. When you're indoors more often and the sun shines less, your body is less able to produce the necessary amounts of vitamin D. Talk with your doctor about taking a supplement.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 19 of 20 Correct

True or false: People with seasonal affective disorder are more likely to catch the flu.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. People with SAD are more susceptible to catching the flu -- and other bugs and illnesses -- during the winter months. That's because SAD is taxing on your body as a whole, which compromises your immune system, making it easier for germs and viruses to get a foothold.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Question 20 of 20 Correct

Which of these medicines is the only one approved for treating seasonal affective disorder?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Bupropion (Wellbutrin) extended release tablets are the only medicine approved to prevent SAD episodes. However, some doctors do prescribe other antidepressant medications, such as Prozac, for SAD.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Congratulations!

You got out of 20 correct. You're a health wiz!

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Good try!

You got out of 20 correct. Learn more about Depression to improve your score.

Seasonal Affective Disorder
Better luck next time!

You got out of 20 correct. Learn more about Depression to improve your score.