Advertisement

What increases my risk for malocclusion?

Having malocclusion, or a bad bite, may be increased by thumb-sucking, losing teeth prematurely and accidents. Protruding, crowded or irregularly spaced teeth and jaw problems may be inherited.

Malocclusions often become noticeable between the ages of 6 and 12, as the child’s permanent (adult) teeth erupt. Your child’s dentist can spot problems with emerging teeth and jaw growth early on, while the primary teeth are present. That’s why regular dental examinations are important.

Continue Learning about Oral Health

Chapped Lips? Avoid This . . .
Chapped Lips? Avoid This . . .
If the cooler fall air has you reaching for your lip balm, flip it over and look at the label. You might want to ditch it if you see this in the ingr...
Read More
What is the American Dental Association?
American Dental AssociationAmerican Dental Association
The American Dental Association is America's leading advocate for oral health. Listen as Dr. Mar...
More Answers
7 Worst Foods for Tooth Enamel Loss
7 Worst Foods for Tooth Enamel Loss7 Worst Foods for Tooth Enamel Loss7 Worst Foods for Tooth Enamel Loss7 Worst Foods for Tooth Enamel Loss
Find out the worst foods for tooth enamel loss and acid erosion in teeth.
Start Slideshow
Gobble Yogurt for Healthy Gums
Gobble Yogurt for Healthy Gums

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.