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Where should my hands go for quick cadence drills?

Quick cadence drills work on the leg turnover rate for a cyclist. It is a neuromuscular exercise that teaches the body how to properly fire muscles and how to systematically and quickly recruit muscle activation to perform fast pedaling. Typically a high cadence is a more efficient pedal stroke, so working this neuromuscular drill will elicit positive training results by teaching the body to properly distribute power in each portion of the pedal stroke. When practicing quick cadence drills, your hands can be in the hoods or the drops, it does not matter and you should experience both. On a climb you will be on top of the bars. In a sprint you will be in the drops. You need to be able to have a fast cadence in both instances, so it is valuable to practice high cadence drills in both hand positions. You may have a different cadence from the hoods to the drops, and that is okay- it is valuable to work on pedaling in both positions. Remember, to perform the activity, increase your cadence until you start to bounce and then back off 10 rpms. Hold this cadence for the duration of each interval.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.