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What are the stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma?

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are generally classified into four stages, depending on the extent of spread along the skin and to the lymph nodes, blood, and other organs. In one system, the stages are designated Stage I to IV, with I representing the most localized disease and IV representing the most extensive disease. Another system assigns a name to each stage: pre-tumor (or patch or early), infiltrative (or plaque) tumor, and erythrodermic (or Sezary syndrome). Pre-tumor is the earliest stage and erythrodermic is the most advanced and extensive.

As with most cancers, it is important to determine the stage of CTCL because this helps the doctors decide on the most appropriate therapy, and it also allows them to provide an estimate of the prognosis. Individuals with pre-tumor stage CTCL have an excellent prognosis: their life expectancy is the same as people without the disease.

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Do the main types of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma act differently?
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Are cutaneous T-cell lymphomas contagious?
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No, none of the lymphomas are contagious.
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What is the rate of incidence for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas?
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How do I care for someone with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma?
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.