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Is Crohn's disease limited to the digestive system?

Crohn’s disease is a chronic autoimmune disease—meaning the immune system attacks the body’s own cells—that affects the gastrointestinal tract. It, along with ulcerative colitis, makes up the inflammatory bowel disease family. Although it can occur in any part of the gastrointestinal tract, Crohn’s disease usually involves the ileum, which is the part of the gastrointestinal tract where the small and large intestines meet. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, this condition can also present with skin rashes, fistulas, liver inflammation, joint disease (like arthritis), eye inflammation, kidney stones and clotting problems can all result from its effect on other organs.

Crohn's disease is not limited to the digestive system. Unlike ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease can have manifestations outside of the gastrointestinal tract. For example, arthritis, skin and eye involement, blood clots and kidney stones can all be related to Crohn's disease.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.