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What are inhaled long-acting beta-agonists?

Donna Hill Howes, RN
Family Practitioner

Beta-agonist bronchodilators are precribed to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They relax the muscles that control your airways to open them up for better air flow. Long-acting beta-agonist bronchodilators (LABAs) are inhaled medications. Some are in powder form, and some are in aerosol form. LABAs are not meant to be used for symptom flare-ups. They are inhaled either once or twice a day to control symptoms.

Several inhaled LABAs are available in the US. These include arformoterol (Brovana), formoterol (Foradil, Perforomist), indacaterol (Arcapta), olodaterol (Striverdi Respimat), and salmeterol (Serevent). Some other products, such as Advair, Breo, and Symbicort, combine a LABA with a corticosteroid drug in a single inhaler. The products Anoro Ellipta, Stiolto Respimat, and Utibron combine a LABA with an anticholinergic bronchodilator in a single inhaler.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.