Contraceptive

Contraceptive

Contraceptive

Recently Answered

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    The generic name for Depo-Provera is medroxyprogesterone. This contraceptive is a type of hormone called progesterone that is given by injection. The Depo-Provera shot can either go into the muscle or just under the skin.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Tri-Previfem is a prescription birth control pill that contains a combination of norgestimate (a form of progesterone) and ethinyl estradiol (a form of estrogen), hormones that regulate a woman's menstrual cycles and fertility. Tri-Previfem is similar to another oral contraceptive, Previfem, except that it delivers increasing levels of norgestimate in weeks one through three. It comes in a pack of 28 pills -- 21 “active” pills in white, light blue and blue, and seven inactive “reminder” pills, which are green.

    Tri-Previfem prevents pregnancy by suppressing ovulation, increasing cervical mucus and inhibiting the implantation of a fertilized egg in a woman's uterus. When used consistently and correctly, it is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

    Tri-Previfem is also approved for treating acne in women at least 15 years old. It works by decreasing the amount of certain acne-causing chemicals in the body.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    The progestin released by an IUD may make anticoagulants less effective.

    If you are taking ulipristal, etonogestrel can lead to side effects and should be avoided.

    If you are taking cyclosporine, the hormone-releasing IUD may not be a good option for you.

    The following drugs can cause hormonal birth control methods, including the hormone-releasing IUD, to fail:
    • anticonvulsants
    • antiretroviral drugs
    • aprepitant
    • barbiturates
    • bosentan
    • dabrafenib
    • griseofulvin
    • mifepristone
    • mycophenolate
    • rifamycin
    • systemic retinoids
    • tranexamic acid
    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Side effects may include headaches, nausea, weight gain, nervousness, depression, high blood pressure, acne, abdominal or back pain, and sinus or upper respiratory infection. Other side effects may include breast pain, a low sex drive, menstrual problems, missed periods, vaginal discharge, vaginitis, or abnormal Pap smears.

    A small hole, called a perforation, can occur in the uterus when an IUD is inserted. This is a rare complication that happens in fewer than 1 of every 1,000 insertions. During the first few weeks after IUD insertion, women have a slightly higher risk for pelvic inflammatory disease. Symptoms include fever, vaginal discharge, lower abdominal pain, painful sex, and unusual bleeding. See your doctor immediately if you have any of these symptoms after having an IUD inserted.
     
    An IUD can slip out of place or fall out. This happens in up to 10% of women within the first year after insertion. The risk is higher for women who have never been pregnant, women under age 20, those who have the device inserted right after childbirth, and those who have heavy or painful periods. Sometimes, the IUD slips without a woman noticing it. If you use an IUD, check the strings regularly to be sure that it is still in place.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    A hormone-releasing IUD prevents pregnancy by causing changes in a woman's cervical mucus and uterus. It thickens the cervical mucus, which helps prevent sperm from entering the uterus. It also changes the inside of the uterus to make it harder for sperm to survive and prepare for fertilization. The lining of the uterus also becomes thinner, which can prevent a fertilized egg from attaching and growing. 

    Inserting an IUD is a quick procedure that is done by a doctor, using tools similar to those used for a pelvic exam. At the time of insertion, a woman may feel cramps and pain, but local anesthesia is usually not needed. The doctor will need to do a pelvic exam before inserting an IUD. Before using a hormone-releasing IUD, you and your partner should have a physical exam. Your doctor will need to do a Pap smear and lab tests for genital diseases and make sure you're not pregnant before starting this type of birth control.

    If you have abnormal vaginal bleeding, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD. If you have a vaginal infection or abnormal vaginal discharge, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD.

    If you have multiple sexual partners or your partner has multiple sexual partners, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD due to a risk of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Abnormal uterine or cervical anatomy can prevent proper placement of an IUD.

    If you have a bleeding disorder, an inherited heart defect, or valvular heart disease, the hormone-releasing IUD may not be a good option for you.

    An IUD should not be used by women with malignant gestational trophoblastic disease or persistently elevated beta-hCG and should be used with caution by women with benign disease.

    A woman's chances of becoming pregnant while using a hormone-releasing IUD are very low. But if she does become pregnant, the chances of an ectopic pregnancy are higher. If you have had an ectopic pregnancy in the past, an IUD may not be right for you.

    A woman who has expelled an IUD in the past has a 30% chance of expelling an IUD again.

    If you have breast cancer or cervical cancer, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD.

    An IUD should not be used by women with uterine cancer.

    If you have pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or a liver tumor, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD.

    IUD insertion is not recommended for women with chlamydia, gonorrhea, or other infections.

    An IUD should not be used by women with pelvic tuberculosis.

    Distortion of the uterus caused by fibroids can prevent the proper placement of an IUD.

    If you have a vaginal infection or abnormal vaginal discharge, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD.

    If you are pregnant or suspect you are pregnant, you should not use the hormone-releasing IUD.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    The hormone-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) is a small T-shaped device made of flexible plastic. It is inserted into the uterus, where it releases a low daily dose of a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel. Hormone-releasing IUDs available in the US include Liletta, Mirena, and Skyla. These are available by prescription and must be inserted and removed by a doctor. The hormone-releasing IUD is also known as the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, or LNG-IUS.

    The hormone-releasing IUD can reduce a women's menstrual bleeding and pain. It has been used to treat symptoms related to endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids. It may also prevent endometrial hyperplasia, an abnormal growth of cells in the lining of the uterus. And it may help protect against endometrial cancer.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    There are many possible interactions between CombiPatch (estradiol/norethindrone skin patch) and foods or other medications. Drinking alcohol can increase negative side effects from using the patch, so limit your alcohol use while on CombiPatch. Do not take CombiPatch with anastrozole or exemestane or other aromatase inhibitors that are used to treat early breast or ovarian cancer in post-menopausal women. Other drugs or foods that interact negatively with CombiPatch can include those that increase or decrease the body's breakdown of estrogens. For instance, drugs that increase estrogen breakdown include: St. John's Wort, carbamazepine, rifampin and phenobarbital. Medications and foods that decrease estrogen breakdown include: clarithromycin, ketoconazole, ritonavir, erythromycin and grapefruit juice. CombiPatch also interacts with some blood thinners, including warfarin.

    Be sure to speak with your doctor about possible drug and food interactions, and provide him or her with a list of any medications you take.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    CombiPatch (estradiol/norethindrone patch) is a prescription drug patch that is applied to the lower abdomen to treat symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and itching or burning. The patch is also a treatment for younger women whose bodies do not make enough estrogen hormone. The patch contains estradiol (a form of estrogen) and norethindrone acetate (a progestin, which is a progesterone-like hormone) and slowly delivers these medicines through the skin. The compounds replace natural hormones that are produced at lower levels in women after menopause or that are in short supply in other women with certain medical conditions.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Estradiol valerate/dienogest is a birth control pill. It contains synthetic (man-made) versions of two female hormones, estrogen and progestin. Taken as directed, estradiol valerate/dienogest is an effective contraceptive (that is, a method for preventing pregnancy). The brand name of this drug is Natazia.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Estradiol valerate/dienogest may cause side effects and increase the risk for certain health problems. That's especially true if you if you smoke cigarettes. If you're a smoker, using estradiol valerate/dienogest increases your risk for a heart attack. If you smoke and you're 35 or older, don't use this drug. Some side effects that may occur if you use estradiol valerate/dienogest include:
    • irregular menstrual bleeding
    • headaches
    • breast pain or tenderness
    • acne
    • weight gain
    • nausea and vomiting