Complex Carbohydrates

Complex Carbohydrates

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    Although cellulose cannot be digested by humans, it is partially digested by beneficial micro flora in the gut, for which it is the primary food source. The natural process of fermentation, which occurs in the colon, results in the degradation of about 50 percent of the cellulose and is an important source of the short-chain fatty acids that nourish our intestinal cells.

  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Complex carbohydrates, or starches, are composed of many simple sugars joined together by chemical bonds. These bonds can be linked in a serial chain, one after the other, as well as side to side, creating branches. Basically, the more chains and branches, the more complex the carbohydrate. The more complex a carbohydrate is, the more slowly it is broken down. Some carbohydrates are complex in a way that the body cannot digest them. These carbohydrates are a major component of fiber and generally pass through the digestive tract unabsorbed.

    In general, as long as complex carbohydrates are present in high-fiber food, the body breaks down complex carbohydrates into simple sugars more gradually, which leads to better blood sugar control. More and more research on heart disease, various forms of cancer, and diabetes indicates that complex carbohydrates, including high-fiber food, should form a major part of the diet. For example, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, diet focuses on a whole-food diet made up of vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, which are excellent sources of complex carbohydrates, high in fiber.
    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    Raspberries are an excellent source of fiber, manganese, vitamin C, flavonoids, and ellagic acid. They are a very good source of vitamin B2 as well as a good source of other B vitamins, such as folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B6. A 31/2-z (100 g) serving is about 3/4-cup raspberries and provides 52 calories, 1.2 g of protein, 0.7 g of fat, and 11.9 g of carbohydrate, with 6.5 g of fiber and only 4.4 g of natural sugars (fructose and glucose).

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Preventive Medicine, answered
    For optimal health and weight control, a 2,000-calorie diet should contain approximately 45% to 60%
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    The starch in carbohydrates affects the way blood sugar increases depending on the form of the starch and the particle size of the food. In raw food, starch is stored in hard, compact granules that are difficult to digest. The cooking process expands these granules to the point where they swell and burst, making the starch become gelatinized. Digestion becomes much easier, leading to a quick rise in blood sugar. The size of the food particles also affects blood sugar. The smaller the particle size, the more rapid and high the rise in blood sugar.w
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Complex carbohydrates are found in many foods. These include grains (bread, rice, pasta, etc.), fruit (of all types), vegetables (both starchy such as beans and potatoes, and non-starchy such as lettuce and tomatoes), milk and yogurt.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Complex carbohydrates are also known as oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Some examples of complex carbohydrates are starches and dietary fiber. Starches consist primarily of long, interlocking chains of glucose or fructose units. Examples of foods containing large amounts of starch are rice, wheat, corn and potatoes. Most starches can be digested and absorbed by the human body ("modified" starch is less digestible).

    Dietary fiber consists of non-digestible complex carbohydrates found in plants. Dietary fiber is poorly broken down by human digestive enzymes. Well-known sources of dietary fiber include whole grains, dried peas and beans, fruits and vegetables.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Galactans (complex carbohydrates found in beans and some vegetables) are almost entirely malabsorbed in all people, because humans do not produce an enzyme capable of breaking the galactose-galactose bond. Galactans in the large intestine are highly fermentable and osmotically active. They can be relied on to cause gas, and give beans their reputation as the "musical fruit."
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Although carbohydrates have been demonized in some popular diets, the right types of complex carbohydrates are good for your heart. That means eating lots of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, while avoiding sugar, white bread, and other refined starches.

    Vegetables and fruits. Diets that include multiple servings of vegetables and fruits lower the risk for hypertension, heart disease, and stroke. Whole fruits and those dark in color tend to be high in fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants -- all of which are good for health. Aim for five or more servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables per day.

    Grain products. You can find grains in cereal, pasta, and bread. The best strategy is to avoid highly refined grains (white bread, white rice, and the like) and instead opt for whole-grain foods, such as whole-wheat bread and brown rice. First of all, the highly refined carbohydrates are digested quickly and tend to have a high rating on the glycemic index, a measure of the rate at which blood sugar rises after you eat a particular food. High-glycemic foods create a spike in blood sugar, or glucose, that triggers a surge of insulin to help cells use this nutrient. As glucose is "burned," blood sugar plummets, making you want to eat again. This "blood sugar roller coaster" boosts triglycerides, lowers helpful high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and increases the risk for heart attack in people who are overweight. Whole grains, on the other hand, take longer to digest and tend to be low on the glycemic index; they cause blood sugar levels to rise and fall more slowly. As a result, you will feel full longer while obtaining more nutrients. Aim for six or more servings of healthy grains per day.

    Fiber. Slowly digested carbohydrates also tend to be high in fiber, a form of indigestible carbohydrate found mainly in plant foods. Fiber can produce a slight decrease in both total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Perhaps more significantly, a number of studies show that fiber helps to prevent heart disease and reduce the risk for a heart attack. The Institute of Medicine recommends 38 grams of fiber per day for men and 25 grams for women ages 50 and younger; men and women over 50 should get 30 and 21 grams per day, respectively.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Fitness, answered
    It is important to eat enough of the right kind of carbohydrates, which are a key source of fiber that moves out hardened waste matter. Many carbohydrates have a more complicated “fibrous” structure, which makes them break down more slowly in your body, and chances are you aren’t eating enough of them.

    Here’s the bottom line: carbs are truly the only source of fiber. The right kind of carbs can eliminate built-up waste in your intestines and colon. Ideally, you should be having one to three healthy bowel movements a day. If you’re eating enough fiber, you shouldn’t have a problem with your body cleansing itself naturally. If you’re not going to the bathroom enough, you might have one of those firm, hard bellies that sticks out. That’s from built-up waste in your intestines.

    Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition revealed that participants who ate between four to seven servings a day of whole-grain complex carbs lost significantly more weight from their abdominal region than those who got their carbs from refined sources.

    You should aim to get most of your six carb servings a day from complex carbohydrates, which will help you get the recommended 25 to 30 grams of fiber a day