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Could I end up in the hospital due to flu complications?

You could end up in the hospital due to flu complications. Complications from the flu kill 30,000 to 50,000 people per year. The most common complication with the flu is a secondary bacterial infection. Sometimes people with pneumonia after the flu end up in the hospital for intravenous (IV) antibiotics and in some cases the need for a ventilator to help them breath while they heal.

Stacy Wiegman, PharmD
Pharmacy Specialist

The flu can lead to several complications that could land you in the hospital. These potentially serious complications include bronchitis and pneumonia. People most at risk for complications from the flu include pregnant women, people over the age of 65, children under the age of five and anyone with a chronic health condition, such as asthma or diabetes. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that anyone over the age of 6 months receive a flu vaccine, it is particularly important that anyone who falls into a high-risk category get a flu shot.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.