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Work Hard, Play Hard Dangers

Work Hard, Play Hard Dangers
In the TV show Mad Men, “work hard, play hard” is touted as a virtue. Yet the characters are, well, slightly mad, and become more tragic and self-destructive every season. Even though it’s just a TV drama, it tells a very real cautionary tale.
 
Working long hours is associated with mental health problems, occupational injuries, sleep deprivation and the risk of cardiovascular disease. And according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, people who work 49-54 hours a week -- and it doesn’t matter where you live, male or female, young or old, ad exec or bus driver -- are more likely to play hard and abuse alcohol at the end of a very long day. If you work more than 55 hours, your risk more than doubles. (More than 12% of Americans work more than 55 hours -- we both do -- and at least 32% of you work 45-plus hours weekly.) So does can a hard-working person avoid the pitfalls?
 
Fortunately, the chain smoking, multi-martini-lifestyle isn’t your only choice! You can opt for positive playtime at the end of a long day -- whether it’s bowling or a baking class, working out at the gym or taking a walk. This smart form of behavior modification (replacing bad behavior with good) helps relieve stress and improves sleep, heart-health and your love life! Then you can have a no-phone/no-TV time with your family. And while this was Mad Men’s last season, you can make sure you have many more seasons to come.
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