Advertisement

Should toddlers' diets be changed after their teeth come in?

A toddler's first teeth will appear around 6 months of age. These teeth are especially sensitive to sugary candies and sweets, as well as juice. Juice can be given but should be only once per day and with a meal, not in a "sippy" cup that the child will have in his or her mouth for an extended period of time. Just like with adults, a toddler's teeth should be cleaned twice per day. It is also recommended to begin serving fruits and vegetables at this age. Fluoride is also an important component for good dental health, even with "baby" teeth. Make sure your county's water supply has fluoride. If not, ask you doctor for a prescription.   
The foods that your child eats definitely affect your child's oral health. While your child's gums can be damaged if you do not care for them properly, teeth are especially sensitive to sugary items like candy and juice. After your children's first teeth come in, serve juice only once a day, serve fruits or vegetables as snacks, and make sure you clean their teeth twice a day.  If your child goes to sleep with dirty teeth -- whether or not from sugary foods -- bacteria can eat those food remnants, leaving behind acid that causes cavities.  Fill bottles or sippy cups with water if they are needed overnight. Although baby teeth eventually fall out it is important to care for them properly, but keeping them healthy can lead to fewer problems with adult teeth.

Continue Learning about Children's Oral Health

Ask the Expert: Dental Tips for Kids
Ask the Expert: Dental Tips for Kids
The first smile ... the first tooth ... the first time the baby happily noshes away on his morning oatmeal. All of these are lovely milestones that pa...
Read More
Avoid These Toxins to Protect Your Child's Teeth
Avoid These Toxins to Protect Your Child's Teeth
The WBA heavyweight title fight in June, 1997 will always be referred to as “The Bite Fight,” because Mike Tyson bit off part of Evander Holyfield’s e...
Read More
What can my child eat after dental surgery?
Heath A. Cobb, MDHeath A. Cobb, MD
After a dental procedure, your child should avoid eating anything sticky, hard, or chewy for one day...
More Answers
What are the side effects of plaque on my child’s teeth?
William M. Litaker Jr., DDSWilliam M. Litaker Jr., DDS
Cavities and gingivitis are the side effects of plaque on your child's teeth. Plaque are bacteria in...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.