Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

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    A answered
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that healthy behaviors like quitting smoking, eating well and exercising regularly can help reduce the risk of developing cancer. Healthy habits, avoiding risky behaviors, and getting recommended early detection (screening) tests, can also improve the chances of surviving cancer and having a better quality of life. 
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    DES-exposed sons should inform their physician of their exposure and be examined periodically. While the level of risk of developing testicular cancer is unclear among DES-exposed sons, males with undescended testicles or unusually small testicles have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer, whether or not they were exposed to DES.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    You can reduce your risk of exposure to radiation from your cell phone by following these steps:

    1.      Put it on speaker. Because your exposure drops exponentially as you move the phone away from your head, you don't have to keep the phone very far away to reduce your exposure by 1,000 to 10,000 times.

    2.      Go wired. In crowded, noisy areas, use a wired headset instead. If you must use a wireless headset, turn it off when you're not using it.

    3.      Store it. Unless you're on it, stow the phone in your purse or bag. If you keep it on your waist, keep it turned off. Studies have shown that keeping a cell phone in your pocket can decrease sperm count.

    4.      Save it for a strong signal. When reception is bad (such as in a rural areas or when you're driving), use your phone for emergencies only. The weaker the signal, the more the radio frequency has to boost itself to get connected, increasing your exposure.

    5.      Protect the kids. Do not let children use cell phones next to their heads. For older kids, it shouldn't take much encouragement to get them to text more than they chat.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    There have been no controlled clinical trials on the effect of regular physical activity on the risk of developing cancer. However, observational studies have examined the possible association between physical activity and a lower risk of developing colon or breast cancer:

    Colon cancer: In 2002, a major review of observational trials found that physical activity reduced colon cancer risk by 50 percent. This risk reduction occurred even with moderate levels of physical activity. For example, one study showed that even moderate exercise, such as brisk walking for 3 to 4 hours per week, can lower colon cancer risk. Breast cancer: The pattern of the association between physical activity and breast cancer risk is somewhat different. Most studies on breast cancer have focused on postmenopausal women. A recent study from the Women's Health Initiative found that physical activity among postmenopausal women at a level of walking about 30 minutes per day was associated with a 20 percent reduction in breast cancer risk. However, this reduction in risk was greatest among women who were of normal weight. For these women, physical activity was associated with a 37 percent decrease in risk. The protective effect of physical activity was not found among overweight or obese women.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.

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    Fasting can neither prevent nor treat cancer. Popular opinion once was that fasting could detoxify your body and cleanse it of impurities like cancer. This is not true. In fact, in certain animal tests, fasting for five to seven days actually caused the tumors in animals to grow. However, other studies have shown that regular calorie limitations do help to slow the growth of cancer.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - olive oil

    Olive oil’s been lauded for helping to prevent cancer, but not all olive oils are created equal when it comes to cancer-fighting power, says Dr. William Li, a cancer researcher and Dr. Oz Show guest. Watch the video to learn which olive oils shine at staving off cancer.


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    A Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of

    Although there are no specific foods that have been proven to help prevent colon cancer, it is recommended that you maintain a diet that is low in fat and high in fiber. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are the best foods you can eat to reduce your risk of colorectal cancer, as well as chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

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    Sometimes cancer can be prevented. Looking at the whole country, it is quite possible that more than half of cancer deaths could be prevented -- if no one used tobacco and if everyone took steps to improve their health. Of course, that is a big "if."

    But is there a way to guarantee that you or your loved ones won't get cancer? So far, nothing has been found that is proven to prevent every case of cancer. As of 2008, there are ways to prevent many cases of cancer in large groups of people. And there are things you can do as an individual that might reduce your chances of getting cancer. If cancer does develop, doctors also use early detection tests to improve the odds that it will be found at an early stage when it is easier to treat. But, as of today, even the best methods of reducing your chances of getting cancer (called cancer risk reduction) cannot prevent all cancers.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    A substance that appears promising in the prevention of prostate and breast cancer is green tea.Several studies of East Asian populations found that men who drink large amounts of green tea have lower rates of prostate cancer, and women who consume large amounts of green tea have reduced rates of breast cancer.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The good news is that the cancers that we fear so much can be diminished substantially with a delicious and simple weapon, tomato (or spaghetti) sauce. Studies have shown that the risk of developing prostate cancer is as much as one-third lower among men who frequently eat foods containing tomatoes or tomato paste than among men who rarely eat such foods. Men who eat tomato products ten or more times a week have a 34 percent reduction in severe metastatic prostate cancers than men who eat tomatoes less than twice a week. Similarly, studies have shown the risk of developing clinical breast cancer is 30 - 50 percent lower among women who frequently eat foods containing tomatoes and tomato paste.

    These findings were backed by a study investigating a wide range of populations in Hong Kong, Tokyo, Milan, New York, Chicago, and Albuquerque. The incidence of microscopic prostate cancer was the same for all groups, no matter what their geographic location or genetic heritage. The chances that those microscopic cancers would develop into full-blown prostate cancer varied wildly across locations, with the number of fatalities due to prostate cancer differing significantly. The areas of the world having the lowest levels of severe, or metastatic, prostate cancer are Mediterranean, especially Greece and Italy, where tomato-based foods are central to the diet. In areas where tomato-based foods are not common, the risk of cancer increased markedly.
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