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How does cell replication make us prone to cancer?

Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Internal Medicine
Inside every human being, about 70 million cell replications occur each day. That replication process is what makes us prone to developing cancer cells. Here's how it works: Each strand of DNA has four letters in its code: A, G, C, and T. When a cell replicates, there are a certain number of typographical errors—meaning the cell miscopies the code (it's like when a piece of paper gets stuck or is only partially copied). That error is just a random error that occurs, given the astronomical amount of copying that's going on. If the letter that gets messed up is in an important part of a specific type of gene, that can convert a normal cell into a cancerous cell.
You: Staying Young: The Owner's Manual for Extending Your Warranty

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You: Staying Young: The Owner's Manual for Extending Your Warranty

International bestselling authors of YOU: The Owner's Manual and YOU: On a Diet give you all the tools and know-how to stay young and defy the ageing process. Drawing lively parallels between your...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.