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Will my baby get enough vitamin D if I breastfeed?

Diana Meeks
Diana Meeks on behalf of Sigma Nursing
Family Practitioner

All infants and children, including those who are exclusively breastfed and those who are fed formula, should have at least 400 International Units (IU) of vitamin D per day, starting during the first few days of life, to help them build strong bones. Research suggests that mothers should be getting at least 600 IU of vitamin D per day to ensure plenty of vitamin D in her milk and for her own health. You can buy vitamin D supplements for infants at a drug store or grocery store. Sunlight can be a major source of vitamin D, but it is hard to measure how much sunlight your baby gets. Ask your doctor and your baby's doctor about vitamin D as well as sun exposure.

This answer is based on source information from The Federal Government Source for Women's Health Information.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.