Breast Cancer Symptoms

Breast Cancer Symptoms

Breast Cancer Symptoms
Breast cancer symptoms may not appear before a screening shows cancer, but there are some signs you'll want to get checked. A breast lump is a common first sign of cancer, perhaps found during a breast self-examination. Other symptoms include a change in the breast's appearance or shape, swelling, lumps in the underarm area and nipple discharge. Know what signs and symptoms could be cause for a doctor visit to check for breast cancer with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    See a doctor if you notice changes in your breast that could signal cancer - even if you've recently had a normal mammogram. Symptoms include lumps and changes in breast skin, shape, or size. All women should conduct monthly breast self-exams and see a health care provider annually for a manual breast exam. The earlier you catch breast cancer, the more likely it will be cured.

    However, in its earliest stages, breast cancer shows no symptoms. Women over age 50 should get regular mammograms, which can catch breast cancer before symptoms appear.

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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    The most common screening tools for breast cancer after self breast exam (SBE) are mammograms and MRI. Mammograms should be performed at the age of 40 and every 1-2 yeasrs subsequently. Patients with strong family diathesis for breast cancer may require early mammograms or MRIs. 

    Any suspicious lesion on either screening test should be followed with a tissue diagnosis by biopsy (fine-needle apsiration, core biopsy, excisional biopsy).
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    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has no accompanying symptoms. Your doctor detects this form of breast cancer by examining a mammogram, or an image of the inside of your breast. Your breast image includes microcalcifications, or small clusters of calcium, that have an unusual shape.

    This cluster could be either DCIS, invasive, or fast growing cancer, or atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), which is not breast cancer, but just a marker on women who are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. To determine exactly what the cluster is, your doctor will need to take a biopsy.

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    A Administration, answered on behalf of
    Paget's disease is a rare type of breast cancer that begins in the milk ducts right near the nipple and areola and then spreads to the skin of the nipple and the areola.

    Symptoms of Paget's disease may include:

    • Redness and irritation of the nipple and/or areola
    • Crusting and scaling of the nipple area
    • Bleeding from the nipple/areola
    • Oozing from the nipple/areola
    • Burning and/or itching of the nipple/areola
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    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) does not cause symptoms and cannot be seen with a mammogram. This condition is usually found when a doctor is doing a breast biopsy for another reason, such as to investigate an unrelated breast lump. If a person has LCIS, the breast cells will appear abnormal under a microscope.
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    A answered

    Parents of preteens (children nine to thirteen years old) frequently discover a peanut- or grape-sized lump under one of their children’s nipples. It happens most often in girls, but boys experience it too. It feels tender to the child, maybe even painful. Naturally, a worried mom—especially one who’s been drilled to do breast self-exams—freaks out and phones her pediatrician. Is it a tumor?! Is it breast cancer?! No. It’s likely a breast bud and a natural occurrence in puberty. However, if the lump is extremely painful, growing rapidly, red, secreting a discharge, or accompanied by a fever—or if you’re just really freaked out—then you should consult your child’s doctor.

    From The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

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    The breast is red because tumor cells have gotten into the lymphatic system of the skin and blocked the lymphatic drainage of the skin. When lymphatics are blocked any place in your body, you get swelling and redness.
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    There are many different signs of breast cancer. This diagnosis needs to made with the help of your physician. Many of the signs of breast cancer are common in benign, noncancerous findings as well. It would be reasonable to discuss any of the following findings with your health care provider: a lump inside the breast or under the arm; swelling, warmth, redness, or darkening of the skin of the breast; changes in the size or shape of the breast; dimpling or puckering of the skin; itching, scaling soreness, or rash on the nipple; nipple discharge; pulling in or dimpling of your nipple or other parts of the breast; and new pain in one spot that will not remit.
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    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is cancer that begins growing in the breast duct and then invades the fatty tissue of the breast outside of the duct. IDC is the most common form of breast cancer, representing 80 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses.

    As with any breast cancer, IDC may not cause any symptoms. Your mammogram, which is a tool that creates an image of the inside of your breast, may reveal a suspicious mass, which will lead to further testing. You may also find a lump or mass during a breast self-exam, in which you manually check your breasts yourself for any changes. Other possible signs of breast cancer you should immediately report to your doctor include:

    • Lump in the breast
    • Thickening of the breast skin
    • Rash or redness of the breast
    • Swelling in one breast
    • New pain in one breast
    • Dimpling around the nipple or on the breast skin
    • Nipple pain or the nipple turning inward
    • Nipple discharge, or liquid leaking out of the nipple
    • Lumps in the underarm area
    • Changes in the appearance of the nipple or breast that are different from the normal monthly changes a woman experiences
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    Some common ailments breast cancer patients experience include weight loss, weight gain, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea and constipation. Also, breast cancer and its treatment can bring about metabolic changes that cause or aggravate symptoms of diabetes.

    Your dietitian can recommend diet modifications based on your breast cancer treatment regime, micronutrient deficiencies and nutrition impact symptoms.

    The following are ways breast cancer nutrition therapy can help combat the side effects of treatment:
    • If you experience nausea, your dietitian may recommend that you eat more cold foods because they don’t have a strong odor, as well as lower-fat items since fats take longer to digest.
    • If you experience constipation, your dietitian may encourage you to eat fiber-rich foods and increase your fluid intake.
    • To combat fatigue, your dietitian may recommend high-protein snacks and small, frequent meals rather than large meals.
    • To help prevent breast cancer recurrence, your dietitian may encourage you to eat more cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, kale, cabbage).