Breast Cancer Symptoms

Breast Cancer Symptoms

Breast Cancer Symptoms
Breast cancer symptoms may not appear before a screening shows cancer, but there are some signs you'll want to get checked. A breast lump is a common first sign of cancer, perhaps found during a breast self-examination. Other symptoms include a change in the breast's appearance or shape, swelling, lumps in the underarm area and nipple discharge. Know what signs and symptoms could be cause for a doctor visit to check for breast cancer with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    The breast is red because tumor cells have gotten into the lymphatic system of the skin and blocked the lymphatic drainage of the skin. When lymphatics are blocked any place in your body, you get swelling and redness.
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    A Administration, answered on behalf of
    Paget's disease is a rare type of breast cancer that begins in the milk ducts right near the nipple and areola and then spreads to the skin of the nipple and the areola.

    Symptoms of Paget's disease may include:

    • Redness and irritation of the nipple and/or areola
    • Crusting and scaling of the nipple area
    • Bleeding from the nipple/areola
    • Oozing from the nipple/areola
    • Burning and/or itching of the nipple/areola
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    A answered
    While many women know that a lump or abnormal bump in their breast is cause for concern, few know that there are other, less obvious signs of a potential breast cancer. These include puckering, swelling and retraction of the skin of the breast or the nipple and nipple discharge. Crustiness around the nipple is related to discharge from the nipple that has dried, forming a crusty scale.
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    A answered
    In most cases, nipple discharge is nothing to worry about. It could be due to cysts in the breasts, non-cancerous tumors or infection, among other conditions. Certain medications can lead to nipple discharge, as can consuming high amounts of caffeine, smoking and hormone therapy.

    Generally, a discharge from both breasts, or one that is yellow, green, blue or black is due to benign causes. But if you have a clear, colorless or bloody discharge, particularly if it is only coming from one breast and spontaneous, you should be concerned.

    In about 10-15% of cases, nipple discharge, particularly crusty nipples, may be a sign of breast cancer. In fact, one form of breast cancer called Paget's disease is marked by a crusty or scaly nipple sore or a discharge from the nipple.

    Bottom line: If you have any discharge from your breast, and you are not pregnant, nursing or have recently breastfed a baby, see your doctor for a complete evaluation.
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    There are many different signs of breast cancer. This diagnosis needs to made with the help of your physician. Many of the signs of breast cancer are common in benign, noncancerous findings as well. It would be reasonable to discuss any of the following findings with your health care provider: a lump inside the breast or under the arm; swelling, warmth, redness, or darkening of the skin of the breast; changes in the size or shape of the breast; dimpling or puckering of the skin; itching, scaling soreness, or rash on the nipple; nipple discharge; pulling in or dimpling of your nipple or other parts of the breast; and new pain in one spot that will not remit.
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    Aluminum-based compounds are used as the active ingredient in antiperspirants. These compounds form a temporary plug within the sweat duct that stops the flow of sweat to the skin's surface. Some research suggests that aluminum-based compounds, which are applied frequently and left on the skin near the breast, may be absorbed by the skin and cause estrogen-like effects. Because estrogen has the ability to promote the growth of breast cancer cells, some scientists have suggested that the aluminum-based compounds in antiperspirants may contribute to the development of breast cancer.

    Some research has focused on parabens, which are preservatives used in some deodorants and antiperspirants that have been shown to mimic the activity of estrogen in the body's cells. Although parabens are used in many cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical products, according to the FDA, most major brands of deodorants and antiperspirants in the United States do not currently contain parabens. Consumers can look at the ingredient label to determine if a deodorant or antiperspirant contains parabens. Parabens are usually easy to identify by name, such as methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, or benzylparaben. The National Library of Medicine's Household Products Database also has information about the ingredients used in most major brands of deodorants and antiperspirants.

    The belief that parabens build up in breast tissue was supported by a 2004 study, which found parabens in 18 of 20 samples of tissue from human breast tumors. However, this study did not prove that parabens cause breast tumors. The authors of this study did not analyze healthy breast tissue or tissues from other areas of the body and did not demonstrate that parabens are found only in cancerous breast tissue. Furthermore, this research did not identify the source of the parabens and cannot establish that the buildup of parabens is due to the use of deodorants or antiperspirants.

    More research is needed to specifically examine whether the use of deodorants or antiperspirants can cause the buildup of parabens and aluminum-based compounds in breast tissue. Additional research is also necessary to determine whether these chemicals can either alter the DNA in some cells or cause other breast cell changes that may lead to the development of breast cancer.

    This answer is based on source information from the U.S National Institutes of Health.  

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    Unlike other breast cancers, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) rarely causes breast lumps and may not appear on a mammogram. Symptoms of inflammatory breast cancer include:
    • Red, swollen, itchy breast that is tender to the touch.
    • The surface of the breast may take on a ridged or pitted appearance, similar to an orange peel (often called peau d’orange).
    • Heaviness, burning or aching in one breast.
    • One breast is visibly larger than the other.
    • Inverted nipple (facing inward).
    • No mass is felt with a breast self-exam.
    • Swollen lymph nodes under the arm and/or above the collarbone.
    • Symptoms unresolved after a course of antibiotics.
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of
    What Are the Symptoms of Breast Cancer?
    There aren't always symptoms of breast cancer, says Laurie Rudolph from Reston Hospital Center. In this video, she discusses signs like lumps, redness and discharge in this video.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    The most common screening tools for breast cancer after self breast exam (SBE) are mammograms and MRI. Mammograms should be performed at the age of 40 and every 1-2 yeasrs subsequently. Patients with strong family diathesis for breast cancer may require early mammograms or MRIs. 

    Any suspicious lesion on either screening test should be followed with a tissue diagnosis by biopsy (fine-needle apsiration, core biopsy, excisional biopsy).
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    Phyllodes tumors are a rare type of breast disease that affects the connective tissue of the breast, as opposed to the more common form of breast cancer that affects the breast duct.

    A Phyllodes tumor may feel like a smooth lump beneath your skin. It may cause your breast to become red or warm to the touch. You may also experience any other typical symptoms of breast cancer which can include:

    • Lump in the breast
    • Thickening of the breast skin
    • Rash or redness of the breast
    • Breast swelling
    • New onset of breast pain, not associated with the symptoms above
    • Dimpling around the nipple or on the breast skin
    • Nipple pain or nipple turning inward
    • Nipple discharge, or liquid that leaks out of the nipple
    • Lumps in the underarm area
    • Changes in the appearance of the nipple or breast that are different from the normal monthly changes women can experience.