Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Beyond a breast exam or mammogram, there are various tests and methods for doctors to diagnose and track progress of breast cancer. The process involves imaging and lab tests, including ultrasounds, MRIs, a breast biopsy and even bones scans to locate tumors and stage the cancer. A medical oncologist or breast surgeon help explain a breast cancer diagnosis and provide treatment options. Learn more about diagnosing breast cancer with expert advice from Sharecare.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses magnetic fields to show differences between normal and abnormal tissue. For most women at high risk for breast cancer, screening with both mammograms and MRI should start at age 30 (or an age determined by the woman's healthcare professional) and continue for as long as a woman is in good health.

    For an MRI scan, you lie in a specially designed structure that houses the magnetic field. Contrast material is injected into your veins, and the MRI image shows the dye coursing through the blood vessels in your breasts.

    This test is used to detect cancer, determine the extent of disease, monitor response to therapy and screen women at high risk for breast cancer.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Benefits of genetic testing for the BRCA breast cancer genes include enabling people to make better treatment decisions for themselves, and potentially saving the lives of family members.

    Researchers found that younger women with breast cancer are increasingly choosing testing to determine if they are carriers of genetic mutations (BRCA 1 and 2) that place them at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

    Because of testing one person, doctors have essentially been able to catch cancer earlier or prevent a cancer diagnosis in that person's relatives by what is called cascade testing, or testing other family members. This testing gives people the tools to really put them at the best chance to catch cancer early or lower their risks.
     
    This content originally appeared online at Baptist Health South Florida. https://baptisthealth.net/baptist-health-news/breast-cancer-patients-opting-genetic-testing/?cat=life
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Women under the age of 40 are usually not screened for breast cancer with mammograms and ultrasounds. In general, we don't recommend such screening unless these young women have a very strong family history of other personal risk factors that put them at a very high risk of breast cancer at a young age.

    Only 2% of all breast cancers are diagnosed in women age 40 and younger. However, the leading cause of cancer death in women under the age of 40 is actually breast cancer. Many young women with breast cancer are not diagnosed until the late stages of the disease and often have a more aggressive type of cancer.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Breast cancer in men is rare, but it does happen: The American Cancer Society estimated 1,910 men would be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 in the United States, and 440 would die. It used to be thought that men who developed breast cancer were more likely to die than women with the disease, but research now shows that both sexes have an equal chance of beating breast cancer.

    Men face a higher risk of breast cancer if the disease runs in their families, if they have been exposed to radiation, or if they have elevated levels of estrogen, which can happen with Klinefelter's syndrome or cirrhosis.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Women who are newly diagnosed with breast cancer face a whole set of fears as they go through various stages of anxiety and acceptance. Many are in a state of denial at first. This can quickly turn to anger and a feeling that their world has been turned upside down. Some women wonder what they have done to deserve this and are unsure about the best road to recovery. Eventually, reality sets in and treatment begins, which is when many women feel better and more in control of their disease because they are actively fighting it.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    The following steps should be taken each day to care for your breast catheter site:
    • Wash and dry your hands before starting.
    • Remove the old dressing from around the catheter.
    • Pinch the wings of the ChloraPrep swab to release the liquid.
    • Swab the skin around the catheter with the moist swab in a circular movement, starting at the catheter site and moving outward.
    • Place two to four drain sponges around the catheter.
    • Use one cover sponge to cover drain sponges and the other cover sponge to pad the end caps. You should not remove any of the caps.
    • Cover the sponges and catheter ends with the ABD pad.
    • Secure the dressings with a bra. Avoid taping the dressings in place.
    • Sponge bathe only, since you do not want to get this dressing wet.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Clinical Genetics, answered on behalf of
    Men as well as women can carry breast cancer predisposing genetic mutations. Men with BRCA mutations face an elevated risk of breast cancer (5-7%). When investigating your family's medical history, you should never ignore a diagnosis of breast cancer in a male relative, or your father's (paternal) side of the family.

    All male breast cancer is not genetic. Genetics may be considered a risk factor, but it doesn’t mean that breast cancer is definitely due to genetic causes. Following a diagnosis of male breast cancer, individuals should consider genetic counseling to  map out the family tree, and discuss the possibility of genetic testing.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Health Education, answered

    Here is a brief explanation of the major sections of a breast cancer pathology report. Each laboratory or cancer center has its own format for its reports. The sections below are based on standardizing guidelines issued by the College of American Pathologists:

     1. Specimen: Describes where the tissue samples came from, such as from the breast, lymph nodes under your arm, or both.

    2. Clinical history/diagnosis: Describes the initial diagnosis of breast abnormality prior to the biopsy or surgery.

    3. Gross description: Describes what the pathologist saw in the tissue samples, including the size, weight, and color of each sample.

    4. Microscopic description: Describes what the tissues and cancer cells looked like under the microscope.

    5. Special tests or markers: Describes the results of tests for proteins, genes, and the speed of cell growth.

    6. Summary or final diagnosis: Describes the important findings in each tissue sample.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    Men, just like women, may have breast lumps. If this be the case, it should be clearly delineated and biopsied, as necessary, in order to determine malignancy versus gynecomastia, versus simple benign tissue.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    A Internal Medicine, answered on behalf of
    How does family history affect my risk of breast cancer
    Family history is often a cause of many cancers. Accordingly, it can increase the risk for breast cancer, says Tejas Raiyani, MD. In this video, learn about the importance of family history.
    See All 3 Answers