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What disorders are associated with Tourette syndrome (TS)?

People with Tourette syndrome (TS) experience additional neurobehavioral problems including inattention; hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); related problems with reading, writing, and arithmetic; and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, such as intrusive thoughts, worries, and repetitive behaviors. For example, worries about dirt and germs may be associated with repetitive hand-washing, and concerns about bad things happening may be associated with ritualistic behaviors, such as counting, repeating, or ordering and arranging. People with TS have also reported problems with depression or anxiety disorders, which may be related to TS. Given the range of potential complications, people with TS are best served by receiving medical care that provides a comprehensive treatment plan.

This information is based on source information from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Tourette syndrome (TS) often occurs with other related conditions (also called co-occurring conditions). These conditions can include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other behavioral or conduct problems. People with TS and related conditions can be at higher risk for learning, behavioral and social problems.

Dr. Charles J. Sophy, MD
Adolescent Medicine Specialist

Disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (intrusive thoughts, worries, and repetitive behaviors), attention deficit disorder, anxiety, and phobias are associated with Tourette syndrome.

Patients with tic disorders frequently have associated psychiatric symptoms such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, and phobias.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.