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What is multiple system atrophy (MSA)?

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a less common condition than Parkinson's. It tends to worsen more quickly and involves a combination of symptoms - including the loss of balance, rigidity and lack of muscle control as seen in Parkinson's, but also a disruption in heart rate, blood pressure and digestion.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symptoms of autonomic nervous system failure, such as fainting spells and bladder control problems, combined with motor control symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, and loss of muscle coordination. MSA affects both men and women primarily in their fifties. The disease tends to advance rapidly over the course of 9 to 10 years, with progressive loss of motor skills, eventual confinement to bed, and death. There is no remission from the disease. There is currently no cure.

This answer is based on source information from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.