BPA

BPA

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  • 1 Answer
    A
    To avoid phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA):
    • Do not microwave food/beverages in plastic.
    • Do not microwave or heat plastic cling wraps.
    • Do not place plastics in the dishwasher.
    • If using hard polycarbonate plastics (water bottles/baby bottles/sippy cups), do not use for warm/hot liquids.
    • Use safe alternatives such as glass or polyethylene plastic.
    • Avoid canned foods when possible (BPA may be used in can linings).
    • Look for labels on products that say "phthalate-free" or "BPA-free."
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) can be found in the following products:

    Phthalates
    • Food storage containers
    • Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing/products (such as water pipes)
    • Flexible plastics, plastic bottles
    Bisphenol A (BPA)
    • Metal cans of food and infant formula
    • Hard-plastic baby bottles
    • Sippy cups
    • Plastic bottles
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Follow my 6-step plan to reduce bisphenol A (BPA) exposure:
    • Eliminate canned foods (BPA lines the cans) and opt for fresh or frozen foods. In a small study, five families who ate fresh foods for 3 days saw their blood levels of BPA drop by 66%!
    • Use ceramic, metal, and glass in the kitchen.
    • Use metal water bottles without BPA liners.
    • Don't use plastic containers with the numbers 3 or 7 on the bottom. Avoid #6 (styrene), too, and buy low-density polyethylene plastic wrap. Even better: See No. 2.
    • Avoid thermal printed receipts. One receipt made from this coated paper delivers about 2% of your daily exposure to BPA.
    • Don't put boiling hot liquid in plastic containers made with BPA. It'll seep into your food.
    All these steps can improve your well-being.
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  • 2 Answers
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    People are exposed to Bisphenol A (BPA) -- a chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins -- primarily by eating foods from containers whose lining contains BPA. Small children may be exposed by consuming foods from containers lined with BPA-containing materials, drinking from polycarbonate plastic baby bottles, and through hand-to-mouth and direct oral contact with plastic materials (like toys) that contain BPA. The amount of BPA to which people are exposed is estimated to be much lower than the amount of BPA exposure considered safe by government agencies.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The following recommendations can help you lower BPA levels in your food:

    • Steer clear of any containers with the number 7 and the initials “PC” on the bottom, as well as any clear, hard, plastic containers with no labeling.
    • Buy BPA-free baby bottles and training cups.
    • Switch to stainless steel or aluminum sports water bottles.
    • Heat food in glass containers in the microwave.
    • Look for alternatives to canned food, beverages, and infant formula.
    • Choose fresh or frozen whenever possible.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 4 Answers
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    The long-term health risks of BPA exposure have been documented by hundreds of studies. The research shows a wide range of health effects. BPA disrupts hormones, has been shown to interfere with reproductive development in animals, and has been linked with cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, diabetes, and obesity in humans.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Nonstick pans and microwave popcorn are sources of obesogens. Animal studies have shown that early exposure to a chemical used to make items nonstick -- perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) -- leads to obesity in later life. It also is known to affect thyroid glands, which are important regulators of hormones that control weight. Found mainly in products like nonstick pans, it's also hidden in microwave popcorn bags and pizza boxes.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    BPA is likely to be in older clear, hard, refillable plastic water bottles, pitchers, and baby bottles -- most new models are BPA-free. But it's also in the lining of up to 80% of food cans, so choose fresh or frozen foods, or look for can labels that shout, "No BPA!" And turn down thermal register receipts, or wash your hands after touching them.

    About phthalates: Six have been banned from cosmetics and kids’ toys since 2008, but others still lurk in toys, food packages, shower curtains, rain coats, hoses and shampoo. Tip from a toxicologist: Avoid stuff with a plastic-y odor, or air it out in a backyard or on a porch for a few days before using.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    How can I avoid exposure to BPA?
    You can avoid risk of exposure to BPA by only buying "BPA free" cans and products, or buying foods in glass jars or boxes. Watch as hormone specialist Jen Landa, MD, discusses a few ways you can avoid exposing your family to BPA and its effects. 
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  • 1 Answer
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    A answered
    They could be. But the real question is how dangerous the typical daily exposure to these chemicals really is to babies and children -- and to us adults, for that matter.

    One of the main controversies concerns a chemical called bisphenol A, or BPA, which is used in many plastic bottles, aluminum can linings, and plastic food containers. We’ve known for years that trace amounts of BPA leach into food and that most people have tiny amounts of BPA in their blood and urine.

    We know that BPA can be harmful to living creatures. In animal studies, BPA has been linked to premature puberty, breast and prostate cancer, immune deficiencies, and brain abnormalities. But for years, the evidence in humans has been slim and inconclusive.

    Consequently, since the 1980s the Food and Drug Administration has maintained that the typical daily exposure to BPA is probably too low to be dangerous to humans. Many doctors have been skeptical about this, but with all the other clear-cut environmental dangers we deal with daily second-hand smoke, lead paint, smog, trans fats, mercury, drivers talking on cell phones -- BPA didn’t seem like the most pressing concern. So it stayed in plastic, and in us.
    In 2008, however, BPA started getting more scrutiny and more media attention. Canada banned the use of BPA in all baby bottles, saying that babies, because of their small size, could be at greater risk from even low levels of the chemical. A study in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that adults with high levels of BPA in their urine had a high risk of diabetes, heart disease, and liver disease. Then the FDA admitted that the two main studies it had long relied on weren’t really solid enough to alleviate fears about the chemical.

    We’ll be hearing more about BPA. Personally, I try to minimize my family’s exposure to plastic food containers in general, and I recommend the same to the parents of my patients. When it comes to a developing fetus, infant, baby, or toddler, reducing exposure to plastics may be especially important, as even minuscule amounts of BPA theoretically could affect their health since their body mass is so low.

    From The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents by Jennifer Trachtenberg.