BPA

BPA

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    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    In addition to being convenient and inexpensive, plasticware is a great way to take food on the go. The problem is that some plastics contain BPA, a dangerous chemical that’s been linked to neurological damage, thyroid issues and even cancer. Manufacturers include the chemical to make plastics that are light, durable and resilient. Most plastic items that are labeled with the number 7 for recycling purposes contain BPA. When these containers are heated, either in the microwave or dishwasher, they slowly melt and decompose, causing BPA to leach into your food.

    Follow these guidelines when using these containers:
    • Never put a plastic container in the microwave or dishwasher. While some containers are listed as “microwave-safe,” that only means they’re resistant to melting – not that chemicals won’t leach into your dinner.
    • Wait for leftovers to cool before putting them into these containers.
    • Throw away misshapen or cracked containers.
    Purchase versatile plastic containers designed to go in the microwave and store hot food—they will say “BPA-free” and are worth the investment! Glass storage containers are also widely available. They’re lightweight, feature BPA-free plastic lids and are safe in both the microwave and oven.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    They could be. But the real question is how dangerous the typical daily exposure to these chemicals really is to babies and children -- and to us adults, for that matter.

    One of the main controversies concerns a chemical called bisphenol A, or BPA, which is used in many plastic bottles, aluminum can linings, and plastic food containers. We’ve known for years that trace amounts of BPA leach into food and that most people have tiny amounts of BPA in their blood and urine.

    We know that BPA can be harmful to living creatures. In animal studies, BPA has been linked to premature puberty, breast and prostate cancer, immune deficiencies, and brain abnormalities. But for years, the evidence in humans has been slim and inconclusive.

    Consequently, since the 1980s the Food and Drug Administration has maintained that the typical daily exposure to BPA is probably too low to be dangerous to humans. Many doctors have been skeptical about this, but with all the other clear-cut environmental dangers we deal with daily second-hand smoke, lead paint, smog, trans fats, mercury, drivers talking on cell phones -- BPA didn’t seem like the most pressing concern. So it stayed in plastic, and in us.
    In 2008, however, BPA started getting more scrutiny and more media attention. Canada banned the use of BPA in all baby bottles, saying that babies, because of their small size, could be at greater risk from even low levels of the chemical. A study in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that adults with high levels of BPA in their urine had a high risk of diabetes, heart disease, and liver disease. Then the FDA admitted that the two main studies it had long relied on weren’t really solid enough to alleviate fears about the chemical.

    We’ll be hearing more about BPA. Personally, I try to minimize my family’s exposure to plastic food containers in general, and I recommend the same to the parents of my patients. When it comes to a developing fetus, infant, baby, or toddler, reducing exposure to plastics may be especially important, as even minuscule amounts of BPA theoretically could affect their health since their body mass is so low.

    From The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents by Jennifer Trachtenberg.
     
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Besides adding to pollution, using plastic bottles may be toxic to your health. The chemical called bisphenol A may be responsible for birth defects, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and even ADD. Bisphenol is present in hard plastic bottles and lined tin cans and is present in plastic food containers and some plastic wraps. Instead, use reusable glass thermoses for water storage or you can even reuse an old glass pop bottle for carrying water. And drink real tap water.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    water bottles
    Some types of water bottles may contain toxins. In this video, Dr. Oz talks about a toxin commonly found in water bottles in this video.


  • 1 Answer
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    Reusable lunch boxes and water bottles are great environmentally friendly alternatives to single-use paper or plastic bags and individual beverage containers. However, studies have shown that some lunch boxes made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or vinyl may contain lead or phthalates. Rigid plastic water bottles and sippy cups may contain bisphenol A (BPA) or PVC.

    At first glance, it may seem overly cautious to worry about an apple rolling around in a lunch box, or water in a plastic container, but all three chemicals found in certain plastics -- lead, phthalates, and BPA -- are cause for concern. Food and beverage containers containing lead should be avoided altogether. Those containing phthalates and BPA should be avoided as much as possible. When lunch boxes and bottles are exposed to heat, chemicals can leach out of the plastic and cause exposures to children through skin contact, inhalation, or ingestion.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Exposure to BPA and DEHP (a phthalate found in many plastic household items) has now been linked to reduced thyroid hormones, which every cell in your body depends on.

    It is now also recommended that you avoid handling thermal paper receipts, like those from gas stations and fast food restaurants, before eating -- especially if you're pregnant!

    BPA is linked to cancer, miscarriage, fertility, obesity, immunity and sexual-development problems. Similar lab studies have linked DEHP and other phthalates to lower sperm counts, reproductive problems and liver cancer.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    The internet is an easy source to find information about almost anything. Since 2004, there were a slew of websites and even emails stating we should avoid drinking water from plastic bottles due to the presence of chemicals like BPA in plastic water bottles. BPA is only found in bottles labeled #7 polycarbonate, not in #1 PET (polyethylene terephthalate ) bottles. The number can be found on the bottom of the container within the triangle. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration carefully reviews new substances intended for food/fluid contact before allowing them on the market. This includes materials, like plastics, intended for food and beverage packaging. Both plastics and plastic additives are subject to FDA review and regulations. Therefore, in most cases, it shouldn’t make a difference which container you drink from nearly as much as what you’re drinking.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Obesogens can be avoided by doing the following:

    • Buy wild fish (such as salmon, which is packed with heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids) and meat products that are hormone- and antibiotic free.
    • Install a granular activated-carbon filter on your faucet to filter out chemicals such as atrazine.
    • Use aluminum water bottles or those that are bisphenol A (BPA)-free.
    • Steer clear of plastics with the number 3 or 7 on the bottom, which may contain BPA. Instead, look for the numbers 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6, which are unlikely to contain BPA.
    • Keep water bottles cool (warm temperatures increase BPA leaching), and never microwave plastic.
    • Eat fewer canned foods. Opt for frozen or fresh instead. Tuna can be found in pouches that do not contain BPA.
    • Get rid of your nonstick pans if possible. If you must use one, never use a metal implement on it that can scratch the surface and release the chemicals inside. Throw away any scratched pans.
    • Buy meats straight from the butcher counter (instead of prepackaged), and ask that they wrap them in brown paper.
    • Skip the air fresheners, open the windows, and try a vase of dried lavender instead.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Over 90% of all canned goods in the United States have BPA. If the label doesn’t read “BPA-free,” chances are that it contains the chemical. More acidic foods like tomatoes, chili, and canned soups appear to have the most BPA. A study by Harvard researchers found that people who ate just one serving of canned soup for five days showed an increase in their BPA levels by over 1,000%.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Many doctors and scientists are concerned about phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) because they can act in ways similar to hormones naturally found in our body. Hormones help control how our body works.

    In studies using rats, phthalates cause problems with male reproductive organs. In children, scientists have found an association between phthalates and changes in reproductive hormones and increased allergies, runny nose, and eczema. In adults, phthalates are associated with changes in sperm quality.

    BPA may cause changes in cells in breasts, the uterus, and the prostate, which may increase risk of cancers. In addition, BPA has been associated with increases in developmental disorders of the brain and nervous system in animals. These developmental disorders in animals are like problems such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in humans.