Advertisement

What are Botox parties?

Arthur W. Perry, MD
Plastic Surgery
Have you heard about those parties where people gather for drinks, hors d'oeuvres, and a little Botox?  Sounds good, doesn't it? Go to a nice social event and look better at the same time. But, what's wrong with this picture? Botox is a real procedure. And lots of things can happen when a needle is pushed through the skin. Like fainting. Nine percent of people faint when they donate blood. And sometimes people can have heart attacks from fainting.



And how about patient confidentiality? Not possible in a group session. And that alcohol they serve at some Botox parties? You can't imbibe and legally consent to a medical procedure. And what about those laws that regulate the medical environment? Do we throw them out?



Botox parties are a bad idea. And the doctors who inject Botox in a group environment are practicing questionable medicine.
Stuart A. Linder, MD
Plastic Surgery
A Botox party is usually associated with many patients having cosmetic injections in a non-medical setting.  I personally, believe it is a setup for Disaster! Only qualified physicians such as plastic surgeons, dermatologists, and facial surgeons should be injecting OnabotulinumtoxinA into patients. Many nurses under the guidance of a licensed physician do perform injections in an office setting. Drinking alcohol and injecting Botox in a social environment by unqualified doctors can be scary to say the least. 

Continue Learning about Botox Injections

Is Botox dangerous?
Discovery HealthDiscovery Health
Yes. Because it blocks neurotransmitters in muscles and makes them relax, Botox inadvertently can re...
More Answers
Who should not get botox or dysport?
Jeremy P. Warner, MDJeremy P. Warner, MD
The key to successful facial rejuvenation is to make sure that the problem or problems are accuratel...
More Answers
Why Is Botox Popular for Removing Wrinkles?
Why Is Botox Popular for Removing Wrinkles?
What Are Some Benefits of Botox?
What Are Some Benefits of Botox?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.