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Is there a greater chance of dislocation after hip replacement surgery?

The chance of dislocation after hip replacement surgery is different for everyone. Most long-term studies show a 0.5 to 20 percent rate of dislocation after total hip replacement surgery.

Dr. Scott D. Martin, MD
Orthopedic Surgeon
In the weeks after a hip replacement, you'll need to take great care to keep from dislocating the implant before the surrounding tissues have healed enough to hold it in place. Even afterward, there is a chance of a painful dislocation—five out of every 100 implants dislocate after total hip replacement surgery. If your hip dislocates, your doctor gives you a sedative while he or she manipulates the implant ball back into the socket. A hip that dislocates more than once usually requires surgery to make the joint more stable.

After primary hip replacement surgery, the risk of dislocation has been calculated to be between 2 percent and 4 percent. Some surgeons have lower dislocation rates, so it may be useful to do some research or to ask the surgeon directly.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.