Blood Modifier Agent

Blood Modifier Agent

Blood Modifier Agent
Blood-Modifier drugs enhance or inhibit the clotting or thinning of blood.

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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Alemtuzumab is one of the more effective treatments for preventing MS relapses. It is more effective than interferon beta-1a for reducing relapses, and people who have had alemtuzumab treatment have less disability. MRI signs of MS-related nervous system damage are also lower in people who have had this treatment. 

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Before you start treatment, your doctor will need to do a complete blood count, serum creatinine measurement, urine analysis, electrocardiogram, thyroid test, and skin exam. You will need to be tested for hepatitis, papilloma virus, and tuberculosis (TB). If you're not sure if you have had chicken pox, you will also need to be tested for varicella virus.

    If you have an autoimmune disorder, alemtuzumab may not be a good option for you.

    If you have active cancer, you should not take alemtuzumab. If you had cancer in the past, alemtuzumab may not be a good option for you.

    If you have had hepatitis B or C, alemtuzumab may not be a good option for you.

    If you have had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, you should not take alemtuzumab.

    If you have had tuberculosis, you should not take alemtuzumab.

    If you have a severe active infection, you should not take alemtuzumab until it resolves.

    If you are pregnant, may be pregnant, or are planning pregnancy, alemtuzumab may not be a good option for you. It is not known if it is safe for pregnant women.

    If you are breastfeeding, alemtuzumab may not be a good option for you. It is not known if this drug can be passed into breast milk.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Factor IX complex is made from human blood. That means there is a very small chance that it could contain germs, including viruses that cause serious infections. In some cases, these infections could result in potentially fatal diseases. People who donate blood used to make products such as factor IX complex are carefully screened for viruses and other diseases. Also, these products are treated in the manufacturing process to inactivate potentially dangerous viruses. These steps greatly reduce the chance that infectious diseases may be transmitted through factor IX complex and related products.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Novoseven RT (Coagulation Factor VIIa) treats and prevents bleeding in persons with Hemophilia A or B and in persons with acquired hemophilia or congenital factor VII deficiency. Novoseven RT is a man-made protein that acts as a replacement for the naturally occurring clotting factor VII in the body. It helps to stop bleeding by helping the blood to clot. Novoseven is known as a clotting factor.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Dextran 70 is a large molecule, called a polysaccharide, derived from glucose. The "70" designates the molecular weight of the molecules in this product. Dextran 70 is injected to increase blood volume by drawing fluid from tissues back into the vascular system. It is also called a vascular volume expander. It helps improve blood pressure and cardiac out-put in patients with low blood volume caused by burns, surgery, hemorrhage or trauma.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Epoetin is the man-made form of erythropoietin, a hormone made by the kidney. This hormone helps your body make more red blood cells. Epoetin has been shown to treat and even prevent anemia.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta is a prescription injection used to treat anemia (lack of red blood cells) due to chronic kidney failure. The medication is in a class called hematopoietics. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta is a synthetic version of erythropoietin, a natural protein that the kidneys normally produce. The medication works by stimulating the bone marrow to produce red blood cells. The injections are usually given in a doctor's office or hospital. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta is available under the brand name Mircera.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    People with high blood pressure that is uncontrolled or untreated should not use methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta. People with anemia due to chemotherapy should not use the medication. People with allergy or sensitivity to methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta or similar substances should not use the medication. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should avoid using methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta.
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    For people who have ischemic strokes or strokes caused by blockage, doctors have a limited window of time to use thrombolytic drugs. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the primary thrombolytic drug used for ischemic strokes. It can actually open up the blockage and restore blood flow to the affected part of the brain.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Neurology, answered
    Thrombolytic drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are often the first line of defense in treating some forms of ischemic stroke. When tPA works, its benefit is long-term. An analysis of a study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health suggested that people treated with tPA were likely to have a better outcome after three months than people who were not treated with tPA. Data from the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study established that tPA can be safely administered up to four-and-a-half hours after the start of stroke.

    However, the more time that passes between stroke onset and the administration of tPA, the less effective the drug becomes, and the greater the risk of hemorrhage. In 2009, the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) recommended that tPA be administered to all eligible patients who can be treated within four-and-a-half hours after their symptoms begin.