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What type of contraception should I use after delivery?

You should consult your healthcare professional since choosing the right contraception for you and your partner, at any time, is based on many things. For the first 6 weeks after delivery, you are at increased risk for blood clots due to the changes of pregnancy.  Due to this, your provider may want you to avoid contraceptives containing the hormone estrogen since this can increase the risk of blood clots even more.  Estrogen containing hormones may also affect breastfeeding when taken close to delivery. Your healthcare professional can review your health history, give you information about the contraceptives that are right for you and help you to choose a method.

Dawn Marcus
Neurology
Contraception after delivery can be achieved with condoms, spermicides, and/or an intrauterine device. Combined hormonal contraceptives are not recommended immediately after delivery, but progestin-only preparations (the "mini pill") may be used.
The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

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The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

Migraines are a common, controllable type of headache that affects one in every six women, more than 20 million in the United States alone. The Woman’s Migraine Toolkit helps readers take charge of...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.