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Why is my partner given high medication doses for bipolar disorder?

John Preston, PsyD
Psychology
Medication doses are often more aggressive at the beginning of treatment for bipolar disorder in order to get very severe symptoms (such as suicidal behaviors, extreme manic agitation, or psychosis) under control. If your partner recently had severe episode, especially if he or she was (or is) in the hospital, the first line of treatment is to get the episode under control. This can mean some really big doses of medications with some very strong side effects. It helps to know that medication doses can often be reduced, at least to some degree (and thus side effects can greatly diminish) once an initial mood swing is under control. For example, a very high dose of a mood stabilizer and antipsychotic may be needed when someone is in a full-blown manic episode, but once the episode is under control, the medication plan may change significantly.
Loving Someone with Bipolar Disorder: Understanding and Helping Your Partner (The New Harbinger Loving Someone Series)

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Loving Someone with Bipolar Disorder: Understanding and Helping Your Partner (The New Harbinger Loving Someone Series)

Maintaining a relationship is hard enough without the added challenges of your partner’s bipolar disorder symptoms. Loving Someone with Bipolar Disorder offers information and step-by-step advice...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.