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How can getting treatment for my bipolar disorder benefit my work life?

John Preston, PsyD
Psychology
Your employer and other employees will benefit from your seeking treatment for your bipolar disorder because not only will you have fewer absences from work, but you may also be more productive, more collegial, and easier to work with due to your newfound stability, predictability, and trustworthiness. You'll help reduce the costs incurred by your employer from absenteeism and high healthcare costs. By getting treatment for your bipolar disorder, you'll begin to feel more secure in your employment and more confident in your ability to do your job, which will give you a new self-confidence that expands to other areas of your life, providing an enhanced and more even mood, which may result in less frequent mood changes.
Bipolar 101: A Practical Guide to Identifying Triggers, Managing Medications, Coping with Symptoms, and More

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Bipolar 101: A Practical Guide to Identifying Triggers, Managing Medications, Coping with Symptoms, and More

After receiving a bipolar diagnosis, you need clear answers. Bipolar 101 is a straightforward guide to understanding bipolar disorder. It includes all the information you need to control your...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.